Electronic Textiles: Smart Fabrics and Wearable Technology Edited by Tilak Dias

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Electronic Textiles: Smart Fabrics and Wearable Technology
Edited by Tilak Dias
Electronic Textiles: Smart Fabrics and Wearable Technology

Table of Contents
List of contributors
Woodhead Publishing Series in Textiles


Part One: Conductive fibres, yarns and fabrics
1: Conductive fibres for electronic textiles: an overview
Abstract
1.1 Introduction
1.2 Types of conductive fibre
1.3 Applications of conductive fibres
1.4 Future trends
1.5 Conclusion
1.6 Sources of further information and advice
2: Conductive polymer yarns for electronic textiles
Abstract
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Bulk CPYs
2.3 Surface CPYs
2.4 Techniques for processing CPYs
3: Carbon nanotube yarns for electronic textiles
Abstract
3.1 Introduction
3.2 CNT forests and drawability
3.3 CNT yarns
3.4 CNT yarn structure and properties
3.5 Applications
3.6 Summary and outlook


Part Two: Integrating textiles and electronics
4: Design and manufacture of textile-based sensors
Abstract
4.1 Introduction
4.2 What are textile-based sensors?
4.3 Methodical approach to developing textile-based sensors
4.4 Types of textile-based sensors (measurement parameters)
4.5 Manufacturing textile-based sensor technologies
4.6 Applications of textile-based sensors
4.7 Future trends
4.8 Conclusion
5: Integration of micro-electronics with yarns for smart textiles
Abstract
5.1 Introduction
5.2 State of the art
5.3 Fibre electronics technology
5.4 Summary
6: Design and manufacture of heated textiles
Abstract
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Types of textile heaters and development
6.3 Design rules for polymer-based textile heaters
6.4 Applications of polymer-based heating systems
6.5 Future trends
6.6 Conclusions
6.7 Sources of further reading and advice
7: Joining technologies for electronic textiles
Abstract
7.1 Introduction
7.2 Joining by textile processing
7.3 Strategies and automatic approaches for textile joining
7.4 Future trends
8: Photovoltaic energy harvesting for intelligent textiles
Abstract
8.1 Introduction
8.2 Background
8.3 PV materials and energy harvesting
8.4 Requirements of textiles to be suitable substrates
8.5 Strategies for rendering textiles electrically conducting
8.6 Technological specifications
8.7 Manufacture of PV fabrics
8.8 Applications: present and future
8.9 Future trends
8.10 Sources of further information
9: Piezoelectric energy harvesting from intelligent textiles
Abstract
Acknowledgements
9.1 Introduction
9.2 Piezoelectric materials
9.3 History of piezoelectricity
9.4 Basic principles
9.5 General theory of mechanical energy conversion
9.6 Different piezoelectric materials
9.7 Manufacturing piezo textiles
9.8 Applications
9.9 Future trends
9.10 Conclusions


Part Three: Applications
10: Embroidered antennas for communication systems
Abstract
10.1 Introduction
10.2 Background of textile antennas
10.3 Design rules for embroidered antennas
10.4 Characterizations of embroidered conductive textiles at radio frequencies
10.5 Applications of embroidered antennas
10.6 Conclusion
10.7 Future work
11: Electronic textiles for military personnel
Abstract
11.1 Introduction
11.2 Applications of e-textiles in military hardware
11.3 Difficulties in designing e-textiles for military use
11.4 Future trends
11.5 Conclusion
11.6 Sources of further information
12: Wearable sensors for athletes
Abstract
12.1 Introduction
12.2 Textile sensor technology
12.3 Applications in the market
12.4 Future trends
12.5 Conclusion
12.6 Sources of further information and advice
13: Electronic textiles for geotechnical and civil engineering
Abstract
13.1 Introduction
13.2 Technical textiles suitable for geotechnical and civil engineering
13.3 Sensors to be embedded in smart textiles
13.4 Smart multi-functional technical textiles incorporating sensors
13.5 Application cases in the construction sector
13.6 Standardisation issues
13.7 Conclusion
Index

List of contributors

  • C.F. Anderson Kanbar College of Design, Engineering, and Commerce, Philadelphia
  • University, Philadelphia, PA, USA
  • P. Bosowski RWTH Aachen University, Institut f€ur Textiltechnik, Aachen, Germany
  • C. Breckenfelder Hochschule Niederrhein—University of Applied Sciences, M€onchengladbach, Germany
  • C.R. Cork Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK
  • T. Dias Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK
  • C. Fuggini D’Appolonia S.p.A., Genova, Italy
  • T. Gries RWTH Aachen University, Institut f€ur Textiltechnik, Aachen, Germany
  • M. Hoerr RWTH Aachen University, Institut f€ur Textiltechnik, Aachen, Germany
  • M. H€orr Institut fuer Textiltechnik (ITA) der RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
  • W. Hurley Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK
  • S. Jockenh€ovel RWTH Aachen University, Institut f€ur Textiltechnik, Aachen, Germany
  • S. John RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
  • A. Kiourti Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
  • G. Loriga D’Appolonia S.p.A., Genova, Italy
  • R.R. Mather Power Textiles Limited, Selkirk, Scotland
  • E. Mbise Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK
  • V. Mecnika Institut fu¨r Textiltechnik (ITA) der RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
  • M. Miao CSIRO Manufacturing Flagship, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
  • R. Nayak School of Fashion and Textiles, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
  • R. Padhye School of Fashion and Textiles, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
  • H. Qu Ecole Polytechnique de Montre´al, Montreal, QC, Canada
  • A. Ratnayake Advanced Textiles Research Group, School of Art & Design,
  • Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom
  • K. Scheulen Institut fuer Textiltechnik (ITA) der RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
  • M. Skorobogatiy Ecole Polytechnique de Montre´al, Montreal, QC, Canada
  • Minyoung Suh College of Textiles, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA
  • J.L. Volakis Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
  • L. Wang RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
  • Z. Wang Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
  • S. Waqar RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
  • J.I.B. Wilson Power Textiles Limited, Selkirk, Scotland
  • D. Zangani D’Appolonia S.p.A., Genova, Italy

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