Industrial Cutting of Textile Materials (2nd Edition) By I. Viļumsone-Nemes

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Industrial Cutting of Textile Materials (Second Edition)
By I. Viļumsone-Nemes
Industrial Cutting of Textile Materials (2nd Edition)

Contents

Preface xi
1 Introduction to cutting room operations in textile good manufacture 1
1.1 Introduction 1
1.2 Storage, registration and inspection of materials 1
1.3 Lay planning and marker-making processes 1
1.4 The fabric spreading process 2
1.5 The fabric cutting process 3
1.6 The fusing of cut components 4
1.7 Final stages in cutting operations 4
Further reading 4
2 Initial preparation and quality control of textile materials in
textile cutting operations 7
2.1 Introduction 7
2.2 The unloading of delivered textile materials 8
2.3 Sorting and physical counting of the delivered textile materials 9
2.4 The storage of textile materials in a warehouse 9
2.5 The quality control of stored textile materials 10
2.6 Influence of textile faults on the industrial manufacture of garments 10
Further reading 12
3 Lay planning and marker making in textile cutting operations 13
3.1 Introduction 13
3.2 The basic principles of the lay planning process 13
3.3 Cutting room management systems 14
3.4 Automation of the lay planning process and cutting room
operations 16
3.5 General characteristics of the marker-making process 18
3.6 The influence of textile material properties on the marker-making
process 19
3.7 Placement of the pattern pieces of fusible components in a marker 23
3.8 The creation of interlining markers 24
3.9 The automated marker-making process 25
3.10 Future trends 26
Further reading 26

4 Principles and methods of textile spreading 29
4.1 Introduction 29
4.2 General characteristics of the spreading process 29
4.3 Fabric spreading modes and their application 33
4.4 Dealing with different kinds of spreads 36
4.5 Fabric quality issues 40
Further reading 45
5 Manual spreading of textile materials 47
5.1 Introduction 47
5.2 Characteristics of the manual spreading process 47
5.3 Manual spreading process modes 52
5.4 Disadvantages of the manual spreading process 56
5.5 Equipment for manual spreading 56
Further reading 59
6 Automated spreading of textile materials 61
6.1 Introduction 61
6.2 Classification of automated spreading machines 62
6.3 Spreading machines with movable feeding systems
(fabric transferring or standard spreading machines) 63
6.4 Spreading machines with stationary feeding systems
(fabric pulling machines) 79
6.5 Spreading machines with mixed feeding systems 80
6.6 Spreading modes in the automated spreading process 82
6.7 Automated fabric fault registration and management systems 84
6.8 The advantages of automated spreading process 84
6.9 Future trends 84
Further reading 85
7 Manual cutting of textile materials 87
7.1 Introduction 87
7.2 Characteristics of the manual cutting process 87
7.3 Notches and cloth marking drills 92
7.4 Accuracy problems in the manual cutting process 95
Further reading 100
8 Manual cutting equipment in textile cutting operations 101
8.1 Introduction 101
8.2 The straight-knife cutting machine 101
8.3 The round (rotary) knife cutting machine 104
8.4 The small round-knife cutting machine (rotary shears) 107
8.5 The band-knife cutting machine 108
8.6 The fabric-drilling machine 110
8.7 The hot notching machine 112
Further reading 114

9 Automated cutting of textile materials 115
9.1 Introduction 115
9.2 Automated cutting systems and their
main parts 116
9.3 Automated knife cutting systems 116
9.4 Automated water-jet cutting systems 140
9.5 Automated ultrasonic cutting systems 142
9.6 Multipurpose cutters 143
9.7 Automated cutting of technical textiles 145
9.8 Future trends 149
Further reading 149
10 Automated laser cutting of textile materials 151
10.1 Introduction 151
10.2 Automated laser cutting systems and their
main parts 151
10.3 Cutting table 156
10.4 Laser cutting parameters 159
10.5 Gantry laser cutting systems 162
10.6 Laser textile finishing (decorating) 163
10.7 Denim laser finishing (denim laser marking, fading, laser wash,
discolouration) 166
10.8 Embroidery laser finishing 169
10.9 Laser cutting of textiles of different origin 173
10.10 Laser cutting for technical textiles 174
10.11 Laser cutting for apparel textiles 175
10.12 Future trends 176
Further reading 176
11 Placement of equipment in the textile cutting room 179
11.1 Introduction 179
11.2 The placement of manual spreads and cutting
equipment/workstations in the cutting room 179
11.3 Placement of automated spreading and cutting
equipment/workstations in the cutting room 179
Further reading 187
12 Fusing of cut textile components 189
12.1 Introduction 189
12.2 The general characteristic of interlinings 189
12.3 Fusing presses and their main parts 192
12.4 Fusing quality problems and their
prevention 200
12.5 Future trends 204
Further reading 205

13 Final work operations of the cutting process for textiles 207
13.1 Introduction 207
13.2 The causes of quality problems in cut components 207
13.3 The quality control of cut components 208
13.4 The recutting of faulty components 211
13.5 The numbering of cut components 211
13.6 The sorting and bundling of cut components 211
Further reading 213
14 Marker making for garment styles from intricate
pattern textiles 215
14.1 Introduction 215
14.2 Marker making for styles made from fabrics with stripes 215
14.3 Marker making for styles made from fabrics with checks 225
14.4 Marker making for styles made from fabrics with motif
patterns 235
14.5 Marker making for styles made from fabrics with border
patterns 237
Further reading 240
15 Multi-ply processing of styles from intricate pattern textiles 241
15.1 Introduction 241
15.2 Manual spreading and cutting 241
15.3 Semiautomated spreading and cutting 249
15.4 Future trends 252
Further reading 253
16 Automated single-ply processing of styles from intricate
pattern textiles 255
16.1 Introduction 255
16.2 Existing limitations and research challenges 255
16.3 Work methods to cut styles from intricate pattern fabrics 257
16.4 Semiautomated single-ply processing methods 259
16.5 Advantages of automated single-ply processing methods 264
16.6 Future trends 265
Further reading 265
17 Marker making, spreading, and cutting of narrow lace 267
17.1 Introduction 267
17.2 The general characteristics of narrow lace 267
17.3 The characteristics of lingerie components cut from lace 267
17.4 Placement of the pattern on the components 269
17.5 Manual processing of narrow lace 270
17.6 Automated processing of narrow lace 274
Further reading 277
18 Cutting and spreading of textiles with pile 279
18.1 Introduction 279
18.2 Marker making for styles made from materials with pile 279
18.3 The spreading and cutting of fabrics with low-cut pile 279
18.4 The spreading and cutting of fabrics with high-cut pile 281
Further reading 282
Glossary 283
Index 291


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