Advanced Textiles for Wound Care Edited by S. Rajendran

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Advanced Textiles for Wound Care
Edited by S. Rajendran
Advanced Textiles for Wound Care

Contents
Contributor contact details xi
Woodhead Publishing in Textiles xv
Preface xxi

Part I The use of textiles in particular aspects of wound care 1
1 Wound management and dressings 3
S. Ather and K. G. Harding, Cardiff University, UK
1.1 Introduction 3
1.2 Types of wound 3
1.3 Mechanism of wound healing 4
1.4 Factors affecting wound healing: why wounds fail to heal 11
1.5 Wound healing: treatment options 13
1.6 Future trends 17
1.7 Conclusions 18
1.8 References 18
2 Testing dressings and wound management materials 20
S. T. Thomas, formerly of Surgical Materials Testing
Laboratory, Medetec, UK
2.1 Introduction 20
2.2 The need for laboratory testing 21
2.3 Fluid-handling tests 23
2.4 Low-adherence tests 36
2.5 Conformability tests 37
2.6 Microbiological tests 38
2.7 Odour control tests 42
2.8 Biological tests 44
2.9 References 45
3 Textile materials and structures for wound care products 48
B. S. Gupta, North Carolina State University, USA,
and J. V. Edwards, United States Department of
Agriculture – Agricultural Research Service, USA
3.1 Introduction 48
3.2 The role of wound dressings 49
3.3 Categorization of wounds 50
3.4 Minor wounds 51
3.5 Healing mechanisms 53
3.6 Wound dressings 55
3.7 Types of dressings available 60
3.8 Bandages 70
3.9 Materials used in dressings and bandages 71
3.10 Textile processes involved in formation of dressings and bandages 79
3.11 Acknowledgement 92
3.12 References 92
4 Interactive dressings and their role in moist wound management 97
C. Weller, Monash University, Australia
4.1 Introduction 97
4.2 Normal wound healing 98
4.3 Wound characteristics 100
4.4 Dressings 102
4.5 Interactive wound dressings 105
4.6 Future trends 110
4.7 Conclusions 111
4.8 Sources of further information and advice 112
4.9 References 112
5 Bioactive dressings to promote wound healing 114
G. Schoukens, Ghent University, Belgium
5.1 Introduction 114
5.2 Physiology of wound healing 115
5.3 Principles and roles of bioactive dressings 117
5.4 Types and structures of bioactive dressings 118
5.5 Example of bioactive dressing: di-O-butyrylchitin (DBC) 127
5.6 Future trends 144
5.7 Acknowledgements 146
5.8 References 146
6 Advanced textiles for wound compression 153
S. Rajendran and S. C. Anand, University of Bolton, UK
6.1 Introduction 153
6.2 Elastic compression bandages 154
6.3 Venous leg ulcers 155
6.4 Venous leg ulcer treatment 157
6.5 Applications of bandages 163
6.6 Present problems and novel bandages 165
6.7 Three-dimensional spacer compression bandages 169
6.8 Conclusions 175
6.9 References 175
7 Antimicrobial textile dressings in managing wound infection 179
Y. Qin, Jiaxing College, China
7.1 Introduction 179
7.2 Topical antimicrobial agents in wound care 181
7.3 Main types of antimicrobial wound dressings 183
7.4 Wound dressings containing silver 187
7.5 Applications of modern antimicrobial wound dressings containing silver 190
7.6 Future trends 193
7.7 Sources of further information and advice 195
7.8 References 195
8 Novel textiles in managing burns and other chronic wounds 198
H. Onishi and Y. Machida, Hoshi University, Japan
8.1 Introduction: current practice in the management
of deep skin wounds or ulcers 198
8.2 Normal treatment options for deep skin wounds or ulcers 201
8.3 Novel wound dressings for managing deep skin wounds or ulcers 205
8.4 Future trends 212
8.5 Sources of further information and advice 215
8.6 References 215

Part II Types of advanced textiles for wound care 221
9 Drug delivery dressings 223
P. K. Sehgal, R. Sripriya and M. Senthilkumar,
Central Leather Research Institute, India
9.1 Introduction 223
9.2 Wounds: defi nition and types 224
9.3 Wounds which require drug delivery 226
9.4 Delivering drugs to wounds 231
9.5 Types of dressings for drug delivery 235
9.6 Applications of drug delivery dressings 240
9.7 Future trends 244
9.8 Conclusions 246
9.9 References 247
10 The use of ‘smart’ textiles for wound care 254
J. F. Kennedy and K. Bunko, Advanced Science and
Technology Institute, UK
10.1 Introduction 254
10.2 Basic principles and types of smart textiles 255
10.3 Characteristics of smart textiles 256
10.4 Textiles in control of exudate from wounds 262
10.5 Examples of ‘smart’ textiles for wound care 265
10.6 Response of dressings to bacteria 267
10.7 Future trends 268
10.8 Sources of further information and advice 271
10.9 References 272
11 Composite dressings for wound care 275
M. Joshi and R. Purwar, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, India
11.1 Introduction 275
11.2 Defi nition of composite dressings 276
11.3 Structure of composite dressings 277
11.4 Materials and textile structures used in composite dressings 279
11.5 Types of composite dressings 284
11.6 Trends in composite dressings: embroidery technology 286
11.7 Conclusions 288
11.8 References 288
12 Textile-based scaffolds for tissue engineering 289
M. Kun, C. Chan and S. Ramakrishna, National
University of Singapore, Singapore
12.1 Introduction: principles of tissue engineering 289
12.2 Properties required for fi brous scaffolds 290
12.3 Materials used for scaffolds 293
12.4 Relationship between textile architecture and cell behavior 294
12.5 Textiles used for tissue scaffolds and scaffold fabrication 298
12.6 Applications of textile scaffolds in tissue engineering 303
12.7 Future trends 308
12.8 Sources of further information and advice 310
12.9 References 312

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