Identification of Textile Fibers Edited by Max M. Houck

11:52 PM
Identification of Textile Fibers
Edited by Max M. Houck
Identification of Textile Fibers

Contents
Contributor contact details xi
Woodhead Publishing in Textiles xv

Part I: Textile fiber structure and characteristics 1
1 Introduction to textile fi ber identifi cation 3
M M Houck, West Virginia University, USA
1.1 References 5
2 Ways of identifying textile fi bers and materials 6
M M Houck, West Virginia University, USA
2.1 Introduction 6
2.2 Identifi cation and comparison of fi bers 8
2.3 Classifi cation of fi bers 9
2.4 Pyrolysis gas chromatography 19
2.5 Analysis of fi ber colors and dyes 22
2.6 Future trends 22
2.7 References 23
3 Natural animal textile fi bres: structure, characteristics and identifi cation 27
S R Tridico, Australian Federal Police, Australia
3.1 Introduction 27
3.2 Animal fi bre growth, structure, composition and properties 28
3.3 Types of natural animal fi bres 35
3.4 Natural animal fi bre characteristics 38
3.5 Identifi cation of natural animal fi bres 44
3.6 Future trends 61
3.7 Sources of further information and advice 62
3.8 Acknowledgements 65
3.9 References 67
4 Synthetic textile fi bers: structure, characteristics and identification 68
K Kajiwara, Otsuma Women’s University, Japan and
Y Ohta, Toyobo Co. Ltd, Japan
4.1 Introduction 68
4.2 Fundamental characteristics of fi brous materials 72
4.3 Common synthetic fibers 84
4.4 Crystal structure of synthetic fibers 86
4.5 Identification of synthetic fibers 87
4.6 References 87
5 High performance fi bers: structure, characteristics and identifi cation 88
Y Ohta, Toyobo Co. Ltd, Japan and K Kajiwara,
Otsuma Women’s University, Japan
5.1 Introduction 88
5.2 The primary structure and physical properties of HPFs 88
5.3 Identifi cation of high strength and high modulus fi ber 95
5.4 Alternative methods for analyzing higher-order structure 107
5.5 Sources of further information and advice 109
5.6 References 109
6 The use of classifi cation systems and production methods in identifying manufactured textile fibers 111
K L Hatch, The University of Arizona, USA
6.1 Introduction 111
6.2 Polymer origins and fi ber classifi cation 112
6.3 PLA/polylactide fi ber 115
6.4 Fiber subclasses 119
6.5 Multicomponent fi bers 123
6.6 Future trends 126
6.7 Sources of further information and advice 127
6.8 References 128

Part II: Methods of fiber identification 131
7 Optical microscopy for textile fi bre identifi cation 133
M Wilding, The University of Manchester, UK
7.1 Introduction 133
7.2 Practical and quality control considerations 134
7.3 Initial identification based on physical appearance 137
7.4 Identification based on properties 139
7.5 Examples of more advanced microscopic techniques 147
7.6 Future trends 150
7.7 Sources of further information and advice 152
7.8 References 156
8 The use of spectroscopy for textile fiber identification 158
M M Houck, West Virginia University, USA
8.1 Introduction: spectroscopy of fibers 158
8.2 Categorizing methods by nature of excitation 159
8.3 Categorizing methods by measurement process 159
8.4 Common methods of spectroscopy 160
8.5 References 163
9 Microspectrophotometry for textile fi ber color measurement 165
S Walbridge-Jones, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco,
Firearms and Explosives, USA
9.1 Introduction 165
9.2 An understanding of spectroscopy 166
9.3 Microspectrophotometer design 167
9.4 Types of microspectroscopy 169
9.5 Perception of color: human vs. machine 172
9.6 Metamerism 175
9.7 Applications of microspectroscopy in fi ber analysis 175
9.8 Limitations, strengths, and future trends 178
9.9 References 180
10 Alternative and specialised textile fibre identification tests 181
P H Greaves, Microtex, UK
10.1 Introduction 181
10.2 Alternative methods of fi bre identifi cation 181
10.3 Scanning electron microscopy 187
10.4 Further techniques 195
10.5 Benefi ts of scanning electron microscopy compared to a light microscope 197
10.6 Quantitative aspects 199
10.7 Sources of further information and advice 200
10.8 References 201
11 Analysis of dyes using chromatography 203
S W Lewis, Curtin University of Technology, Australia
11.1 Introduction 203
11.2 Dyes 204
11.3 Forensic analysis of dyes 206
11.4 Conclusions 219
11.5 Sources of further information and advice 220
11.6 Acknowledgments 220
11.7 References 220
12 DNA analysis in the identifi cation of animal fi bers in textiles 224
P F Hamlyn, BTTG Ltd, UK
12.1 Introduction 224
12.2 Extraction of DNA from animal fi bers 226
12.3 Development of methods for using DNA analysis to identify animal fi bers 227
12.4 Effect of fi ber processing on DNA analysis and the use of DNA amplifi cation technology 229
12.5 Future trends 233
12.6 Sources of further information and advice 235
12.7 References 236

Part III: Applications 237
13 Identifying plant fi bres in textiles: the case of cotton 239
S Gordon, CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, Australia
13.1 Introduction 239
13.2 Cotton fi bre structure and composition 241
13.3 Cotton fi bre properties 245
13.4 Future trends 256
13.5 Sources of further information and advice 256
13.6 References 256
14 The forensic identifi cation of textile fi bers 259
M M Houck, West Virginia University, USA
14.1 A forensic mindset 259
14.2 Microscopy of fi bers 261
14.3 Manufactured fi ber production and spinning 262
14.4 Polarized light microscopy 266
14.5 Fluorescence microscopy 271
14.6 Conclusions 272
14.7 References and further reading 273
15 Identifying and analyzing textile damage in the textile industry 275
W D Schindler, University of Applied Sciences Hof, Germany
15.1 Introduction: importance of and reasons for textile damage analysis in the textile industry 275
15.2 Main types, manifestations and causes of textile damage 278
15.3 Methods of identifying and analyzing textile damage 280
15.4 Damage analysis according to the type of fi ber 292
15.5 Damage analysis of cellulosics, especially cotton 292
15.6 Damage analysis of wool 295
15.7 Damage analysis of silk 303
15.8 General types of damage to synthetics 304
15.9 Analysis of damage to polyester fi bers 306
15.10 Analysis of damage to nylon fi bers 309
15.11 Analysis of damage to acrylic fi bers 311
15.12 Analysis of damage to elastane (spandex) fi bers 312
15.13 Analysis of damage to polyolefi n fi bers, especially polypropylene 317
15.14 Special types of textile damage and their analysis 320
15.15 Sources of further information and advice 325
15.16 Conclusions 326
15.17 Acknowledgment 327
15.18 References 327
16 The role of fi bre identifi cation in textile conservation 335
P Garside, University of Southampton, UK
16.1 Introduction 335
16.2 Analytical techniques 337
16.3 Conservation strategies 349
16.4 Case studies 351
16.5 Future trends 356
16.6 Sources of further information and advice 357
16.7 Acknowledgements 357
16.8 References 358
Index 366

Read "Identification of Textile Fibers" as PDF
How to Get Book? To get any book you can send Email: textileebooks@gmail.com

Share this

Related Posts

Previous
Next Post »