Smart Textiles for Medicine and Healthcare: Materials, Systems and Applications Edited by L. Van Langenhove

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Smart Textiles for Medicine and Healthcare: Materials, Systems and Applications
Edited by L. Van Langenhove
Smart Textiles for Medicine and Healthcare

Contents
Contributor contact details xi
Introduction xv

Part I Types of smart medical textile
1 Trends in smart medical textiles 3
S BLACK, University of the Arts London, UK
1.1 Introduction 3
1.2 Advantages of textiles in medical and healthcare 4
1.3 Drivers for smart textiles in medical care 8
1.4 Examples of research and product development 12
1.5 Future trends 20
1.6 Conclusions 23
1.7 Sources of further information and advice 24
1.8 References 25
2 Smart wound-care materials 27
Y QIN, Jiaxing College, China
2.1 Introduction 27
2.2 Functional requirement for modern wound-care materials 29
2.3 Smart materials used in modern wound-care products 31
2.4 Composite wound-care products 41
2.5 Current developments and future trends 42
2.6 Sources of further information and advice 47
2.7 References 48
3 Textile-based drug release systems 50
V A NIERSTRASZ, University of Twente, The Netherlands
3.1 Introduction 50
3.2 Mechanisms of drug release 52
3.3 Characteristics and application of drug release systems 58
3.4 Future trends 69
3.5 Acknowledgements 70
3.6 References and further reading 70
4 Application of phase change and shape memory materials in medical textiles 74
B PAUSE, Textile Testing and Innovation, USA
4.1 Introduction 74
4.2 Physical effects 75
4.3 Materials 78
4.4 Application in medical textiles 81
4.5 Future trends 85
4.6 Sources of further information and advice 85
4.7 References 86
5 The use of electronics in medical textiles 88
M CATRYSSE, F PIROTTE Centexbel, Belgium and R PUERS, Katholieke
Universiteit Leuven, Belgium
5.1 Introduction 88
5.2 Challenges when integrating electronics in textiles 91
5.3 Textile-based electronic components 91
5.4 Power management 96
5.5 Packaging issues 101
5.6 Future trends 103
5.7 Sources of further information and advice 103
5.8 Acknowledgements 104
5.9 References 104
6 Textile sensors for healthcare 106
L VAN LANGENHOVE, C HERTLEER and P WESTBROEK,
Ghent University, Belgium and J PRINIOTAKIS, TEI Pireaus, Greece
6.1 Introduction 106
6.2 Smart textiles 107
6.3 Conductive fibres and fibrous materials 109
6.4 Testing of ECG electrodes 112
6.5 Testing of strain sensors 116
6.6 Future applications of smart textiles 119
6.7 Conclusions 121
6.8 References 122
7 Smart dyes for medical and other textiles 123
T RIJAVEC and S BRACˇKO, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
7.1 Introduction 123
7.2 Colour change mechanisms 124
7.3 Advantages and limitations of application 132
7.4 Examples of application 134
7.5 Application processes 139
7.6 Future trends 142
7.7 Sources of further information and advice 146
7.8 References 147

Part II Smart medical textiles for particular types of patient
8 Intelligent garments for prehospital emergency care 153
N LINTU, M MATTILA and O HÄNNINEN, University of Kuopio, Finland
8.1 Introduction 153
8.2 Different cases and situations 154
8.3 Circumstances 154
8.4 Vital functions 154
8.5 Monitoring of vital functions 155
8.6 Selection of monitoring methods 157
8.7 Interpretation of monitored parameters 157
8.8 Telemedicine 158
8.9 Negative effects of transportation on vital parameters 158
8.10 Patient chart 159
8.11 Data security 159
8.12 Day surgery 159
8.13 Protective covering 160
8.14 An integrated monitoring of vital functions 161
8.15 Mobile isolation 161
8.16 Optimal smart solution for prehospital emergency care 162
8.17 Conclusions 164
8.18 References 164
9 Smart medical textiles in rehabilitation 166
J MCCANN, University of Newport, UK
9.1 Introduction 166
9.2 Smart textiles in rehabilitation 167
9.3 Applications 173
9.4 Future trends 176
9.5 Sources of further information and advice 180
9.6 References 181
10 Smart medical textiles for monitoring pregnancy 183
P BOUGIA, E KARVOUNIS and D I FOTIADIS, University of
Ioannina, Greece
10.1 Introduction 183
10.2 Methodology 186
10.3 Results 199
10.4 Discussion 200
10.5 Acknowledgements 204
10.6 References 204
11 Smart textiles for monitoring children in hospital 206
C HERTLEER and L VAN LANGENHOVE, Ghent University, Belgium and
R PUERS, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium
11.1 Introduction 206
11.2 Concepts 207
11.3 Smart textiles for children in a hospital environment 208
11.4 Conclusion 218
11.5 Acknowledgements 220
11.6 References 220
12 Wearable textiles for rehabilitation of disabled patients using pneumatic systems 221
G BELFORTE, G QUAGLIA, F TESTORE, G EULA and S APPENDINO,
Politecnico di Torino, Italy
12.1 Introduction 221
12.2 Deformable pneumatic actuators 222
12.3 State of the art: applications and research 242
12.4 Future trends 249
12.5 References 251
13 Wearable assistants for mobile health monitoring 253
T KIRSTEIN, G TRÖSTER, I LOCHER and C KÜNG, ETH Zürich,
Switzerland
13.1 Introduction 253
13.2 Vision of wearable health assistant 253
13.3 Approach 255
13.4 Electronic textile technology 256
13.5 Context recognition technology 268
13.6 Wearable components 268
13.7 Applications 269
13.8 Outlook 272
13.9 Acknowledgement 272
13.10 References 272
14 Smart medical textiles for monitoring patients with heart conditions 275
O AMFT, ETH Zürich, Switzerland and J HABETHA, Philips Research
Labs, Germany
14.1 Introduction 275
14.2 Personal health care: from monitoring to coaching 279
14.3 Technical challenges for monitoring, analysis and feedback 282
14.4 Evolution of MyHeart approach and related work 294
14.5 Sources of further information and advice 297
14.6 Acknowledgements 297
14.7 References 297
Index 302

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