Encyclopedia of Clothing and Fashion, Volume 3: Occult Dress to Zoran, Index

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Encyclopedia of Clothing and Fashion, Volume 3: Occult Dress to Zoran, Index
Valerie Steele, Editor in Chief
Encyclopedia of Clothing and Fashion

Contents:
O
Occult Dress
Oilskins
Olefin Fibers
Orientalism
Outerwear
P
Pagne and Wrapper
Paisley
Pajamas
Panties
Paper Dresses
Paquin, Jeanne
Paris Fashion
Parka
Patou, Jean
Patterns and Patternmaking
Penis Sheath
Penn, Irving
Performance Finishes
Perfume
Petticoat
Pins
Plaid
Plastic and Cosmetic Surgery
Pockets
Pointe Shoes
Poiret, Paul
Politics and Fashion
Polo Shirt
Polyester
Prada
Prison Dress
Professional Associations
Protective Clothing
Proust, Marcel
Psychedelic Fashion
Pucci, Emilio
Punk
Q
Qipao
Quant, Mary
Quilting
R
Rabanne, Paco
Raincoat
Rainwear
Ramie
Rayon
Ready-to-Wear
Recycled Textiles
Reenactors
Religion and Dress
Retailing
Retro Styles
Rhodes, Zandra
Ribbon
Rings
Robe
Roma and Gypsy
Royal and Aristocratic Dress
Rubber as Fashion Fabric
Russia: History of Dress
Rykiel, Sonia
S
Safety Pins
Saint Laurent, Yves
Salwar-Kameez
Sandals
Sapeurs
Sari
Sarong
Savile Row
Scarf
Scarification
Schiaparelli, Elsa
Scottish Dress
Seamstresses
Secondhand Clothes, Anthropology of
Secondhand Clothes, History of
Seventh Avenue
Sewing Machine
Seydou, Chris
Shawls
Shirt
Shirtwaist
Shoemaking
Shoes
Shoes, Children’s
Shoes, Men’s
Shoes, Women’s
Shopping
Shroud
Silk
Simmel, Georg
Skating Dress
Ski Clothing
Skirt
Skirt Supports
Slip
Smith, Paul
Smith, Willi
Sneakers
Social Class and Clothing
Space Age Styles
Space Suit
Spangles
Spanish Dress
Spinning
Spinning Machinery
Sport Shirt
Sport Shoes
Sports Jacket
Sportswear
Steele, Lawrence
Stockings, Women’s
Street Style
Striped Cloth
Striptease
Subcultures
Suit, Business
Sumptuary Laws
Sunglasses
Supermodels
Sweater
Sweatshirt
Sweatshops
Swimwear
Sy, Ouman
T
Tailored Suit
Tailoring
Tanning of Leather
Tapestry
Tartan
Tattoos
Tea Gown
Techno-textiles
Teenage Fashions
Tennis Costumes
Textiles, African
Textiles, Andean
Textiles, Byzantine
Textiles, Central Asian
Textiles, Chinese
Textiles, Coptic
Textiles, Japanese
Textiles, Middle Eastern
Textiles, Prehistoric
Textiles, South Asian
Textiles, Southeast Asian Islands
Textiles, Southeast Asian Mainland
Textiles and International Trade
Textile Workers
Theatrical Costume
Theatrical Makeup
Tie-Dyeing
Tight-Lacing
Toga
Toledo, Isabel and Ruben
Traditional Dress
Travel Clothing
Treacy, Philip
Trendsetters
Trickle-Down
Trigère, Pauline
Trimmings
Trousers
T-Shirt
Turban
Tuxedo
Tweed
Twentieth-Century Fashion
Twiggy
U
Umbrellas and Parasols
Underwear
Uniforms, Diplomatic
Uniforms, Military
Uniforms, Occupational
Uniforms, School
Uniforms, Sports
Unisex Clothing
Uzanne, Octave
V
Valentina
Valentino
Veblen, Thorstein
Veils
Velvet
Versace, Gianni and Donatella
Viktor & Rolf
Vintage Fashion
Vinyl as Fashion Fabric
Vionnet, Madeleine
Vogue
von Furstenberg, Diane
Vreeland, Diana
Vuitton, Louis
W
Waistcoat
Watches
Wearable Art
Weave, Double
Weave, Jacquard
Weave, Pile
Weave, Plain
Weave, Satin
Weave, Slack Tension
Weave, Twill
Weave Types
Weaving
Weaving, Machinery
Wedding Costume
Westwood, Vivienne
Wigs
Wilde, Oscar
Windbreaker
Window Displays
Windsor, Duke and Duchess of
Women’s Wear Daily
Wool
Working-Class Dress
Worsted
Worth, Charles Frederick
X
Xuly Bët
Y
Yamamoto, Yohji
Yarns
Yeohlee
Youthquake Fashions
Yukata
Z
Zipper
Zoot Suit
Zoran
Systematic Outline of Contents . . . 469
Directory of Contributors . . . 481
Index . . . 493

OCCULT DRESS
Occultism is any nonmainstream Western system of spirituality that uses magic, the definition of magic being the way in which internal thoughts are used to effect changes in the outside world. Occultists, such as northern European Pagans (e.g., Wiccans, Druids, and witches) and ceremonial magicians (Cabalists, hermetics, and the like) practice magic as part of their religions. Occult dress is used when participating in magic rites, rituals, or ceremonies. Western occult dress has three primary functions: (1) to psychologically place the wearer in an extraordinary sense of reality; (2) to identify the status of the wearer within a social group; and (3) to indicate the beliefs of the wearer.

Occult beliefs promote nudity as occult dress, because clothing is believed to impede the flow of magical energies through the body from the surrounding environment. Wicca practitioners and witches have traditionally performed rites in the nude to show their devotion to the Wiccan goddess. Due to modesty or weather, some occultists wear robes or tunics with bare feet and no undergarments. This latter dress is believed to still allow the flow of magical energies. Many covens and magical groups have set occult dress guidelines, using tradition or personal tastes as a basis for these guidelines. Occult dress, especially nudity, is not a common Western mode of dress, therefore it psychologically alerts and reinforces the awareness of special occasions and presence of magic for occultists. Each magical group sets the guidelines for occult dress. There is not a specific literature, although a magical group may draw inspiration from books, movies, or even more mainstream cultural practices. Some occult groups don garments symbolically colored according to a ceremony or rite. For example, a Northern European Pagan coven may don white clothes to celebrate Yule rites and green clothes to celebrate Beltane festivals. Ceremonial magic groups, such as the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, have an extensive magical color symbolism, and thus certain colored clothing is worn for a specific ritual. This is done in order to mentally link the practitioner to the rites being performed, raising awareness and effectiveness of the spiritual ritual.

Occult dress is also used to indicate status within a group. Wiccan high priestesses of Alexandrian lineages indicate status to other initiates by a colored leg garter. Also, a waist cord may be worn in the same group to indicate the wearer having taken oaths pertaining to a level of initiation. Other occult groups, such as the Order of Bards, Ovates, and Druids, who originated in England, wear colored robes denoting rank during some occult ceremonies. Cultural disposition is another motivation for specific occult dress. For example, Asatru practitioners may don tunics and mantles of historic Germanic styles to denote their affiliation to the ancient Teutonic religion. Celtic knotwork designs on clothing and jewelry may be worn to show an affiliation to Druidism and other ancient Celtic spiritualities.

Western occult dress tends to be self-manufactured (sewn by the practitioner or by a fellow occult member), or if technical skills are lacking, utilizes existing everyday clothing for a magical purpose such as a silk bathrobe purchased at a department store that could be worn in ritual as magical raiment.


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