Rehabilitation of Metallic Civil Infrastructure using Fiber-reinforced Polymer (FRP) Composites Edited by Vistasp M. Karbhari

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Rehabilitation of Metallic Civil Infrastructure using Fiber-reinforced Polymer (FRP) Composites
Edited by Vistasp M. Karbhari
Rehabilitation of Metallic Civil Infrastructure using Fiber-reinforced Polymer (FRP) Composites

Contents
Contributor contact details xiii
Woodhead Publishing Series in Civil
and Structural Engineering xvii
Preface xxi
Part I Introduction and overview 1
1 Rehabilitation of metallic civil infrastructure using fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites: a materials and systems overview at the adhesive bond level 3
V. M. Karbhari, University of Texas at Arlington, USA
1.1 Introduction 3
1.2 Overall considerations 4
1.3 Understanding adhesive bonds 5
1.4 Bond level considerations 7
1.5 Summary and conclusion 10
2 Repair of metallic airframe components using
fi bre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites 11
A. A. Baker, Advanced Composite Structures,
Australia and Defence Science and Technology
Organisation, Australia
2.1 Introduction 11
2.2 Metallic airframe components 13
2.3 Key issues in repair 14
2.4 The use of adhesively bonded patch repairs 16
2.5 Composite materials and adhesives for bonded
patch repairs 19
2.6 Application technologies and non-destructive inspection
of bonded repairs 22
2.7 Design and modelling of bonded composite repairs 26
2.8 Certifi cation of repairs to primary structures 37
2.9 Validation of certifi ed repairs 42
2.10 Case studies 47
2.11 Conclusion: limitations and lessons learnt 52
2.12 Acknowledgement 55
2.13 Sources of further information and advice 55
2.14 References 56
3 Finite element modelling of adhesive bonds joining
fi bre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites to steel 60
R. Haghani, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden
3.1 Introduction 60
3.2 Behaviour of adhesive joints 61
3.3 Analysis of adhesive joints 64
3.4 Singular stress fi elds 72
3.5 Strain distribution in adhesive joints 75
3.6 The contribution of the fi nite element method in the
analysis of geometrically modifi ed adhesive joints 86
3.7 Conclusion 91
3.8 References 92
4 Durability of steel components strengthened with
fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites 96
M. Dawood, University of Houston, USA
4.1 Introduction 96
4.2 Basic degradation mechanisms 97
4.3 Galvanic corrosion 98
4.4 Degradation of the bulk adhesive 103
4.5 Degradation of the steel/adhesive interface 107
4.6 Conclusion and future trends 111
4.7 Sources of further information and advice 112
4.8 References 112
Part II Application to components 115
5 Enhancing the stability of structural steel components
using fi bre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites 117
K. A. Harries, University of Pittsburgh, USA
5.1 Introduction 117
5.2 Inelastic section (local) buckling 118
5.3 Buckling (crippling) induced by high local stresses 123
5.4 Elastic global (Euler) buckling 126
5.5 Field applications of fi bre-reinforced polymer (FRP)-
stabilised steel sections 129
5.6 Conclusion and future trends 135
5.7 References 135
6 Strengthening of thin-walled (hollow) steel sections
using fi bre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites 140
M. R. Bambach, University of New South Wales, Australia
6.1 Introduction 140
6.2 Testing thin-walled steel square hollow sections (SHS)
and spot-welded (SW) SHS strengthened with carbon
fi bre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites 142
6.3 Strengthening of thin-walled steel sections for axial
compression 150
6.4 Strengthening of thin-walled steel sections for axial impact 156
6.5 The role of the steel–CFRP bond 163
6.6 Conclusion and future trends 165
6.7 References 166
7 Rehabilitation of steel tension members using
fi ber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites 169
F. Matta, University of South Carolina, USA and
M. Dawood, University of Houston, USA
7.1 Introduction 169
7.2 Repair methods 170
7.3 Adhesive bonding of fi ber-reinforced polymer (FRP)
laminates 172
7.4 Materials 174
7.5 Bond enhancement 178
7.6 Fundamentals of analysis and design 184
7.7 Conclusion and future trends 191
7.8 Sources of further information and advice 194
7.9 References 195
8 Rehabilitation of cracked aluminum components
using fi ber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites 201
C. P. Pantelides, University of Utah, USA
8.1 Introduction 201
8.2 Rehabilitation of connections in aluminum overhead
sign structures (OSS) 203
8.3 Static tests of K-tube-to-tube connections 206
8.4 Constant amplitude fatigue performance of K-tube-to-tube
connections 209
8.5 Conclusion and future trends 213
8.6 Acknowledgments 214
8.7 References 214
Part III Fatigue performance 215
9 Fatigue life of adhesive bonds joining carbon
fi bre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites to
steel components 217
J. Deng, Guangdong University of Technology, China
and M. M. K. Lee, Curtin University Sarawak,
Malaysia
9.1 Introduction 217
9.2 Previous research on the fatigue performance of
adhesive bonding between carbon fi bre-reinforced
polymer (CFRP) plates and steel substrates 218
9.3 Modelling and predicting fatigue of adhesive bonds 221
9.4 Testing adhesive bonds 225
9.5 Test results and analysis 228
9.6 Conclusion and future trends 235
9.7 Acknowledgements 237
9.8 References 237
10 Fatigue life of steel components strengthened with
fi bre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites 239
P. Colombi and G. Fava, Technical University of Milan
(Politecnico di Milano), Italy
10.1 Introduction 239
10.2 Improvement of the fatigue life of steel components 242
10.3 Fracture mechanics modelling 245
10.4 Fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) strengthening of
steel girders 258
10.5 Strengthening of welded details 260
10.6 Design of FRP reinforcement 262
10.7 Conclusion and future trends 265
10.8 References 265
11 Extending the fatigue life of steel bridges using
fi ber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites 269
R. Barrett-Gonzalez, S. Rolfe, A. Matamoros and
C. Bennett, University of Kansas, USA
11.1 Introduction 269
11.2 The development of composite materials for the repair
of fatigue damage 271
11.3 Understanding fatigue damage in steel bridges 274
11.4 Repair of fatigue cracks in plates subjected to tension 278
11.5 Repair of welded connections 286
11.6 Repair of fatigue damage due to out-of-plane forces 298
11.7 Conclusion 317
11.8 References 317
Part IV Application to infrastructure systems 321
12 Using fi bre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites to
rehabilitate differing types of metallic infrastructure 323
L. C. Hollaway, University of Surrey, UK
12.1 Introduction 323
12.2 Types of metallic materials and structures needing
rehabilitation 325
12.3 Structural defi ciencies in metallic structures 328
12.4 Strengthening metallic structures using fi bre-reinforced
polymer (FRP) composites 330
12.5 Rehabilitating cast iron bridges and other structures:
case studies 336
12.6 Rehabilitating steel structures: case studies 354
12.7 Rehabilitating an aluminium beam structure: a case study 356
12.8 Rehabilitation of onshore and offshore pipe work and
other infrastructure 360
12.9 Conclusion: the use of FRP composites to strengthen
metallic structures 366
12.10 Acknowledgements 368
12.11 References 369
13 Assessment and rehabilitation of steel
railway bridges using fi bre-reinforced polymer
(FRP) composites 373
A. Pipinato, University of Padova, Italy
13.1 Introduction 373
13.2 Assessment procedures for damaged bridges 375
13.3 Rehabilitation and strengthening of bridges with
fi bre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites 379
13.4 Rehabilitation and strengthening against corrosion 388
13.5 Strengthening of structural members 390
13.6 Conclusion 401
13.7 References 402
14 Strengthening of historic metallic structures using
fi bre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites 406
S. Moy, formerly University of Southampton, UK
14.1 Introduction 406
14.2 Brief history of the use of cast iron and wrought iron 407
14.3 Production, metallurgy and properties of historic irons 409
14.4 Structures in cast and wrought iron 416
14.5 Fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite strengthening of cast and wrought iron structures 417
14.6 Conclusion 427
14.7 References 428
Index 431


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