Care and Maintenance of Textile Products Including Apparel and Protective Clothing | Rajkishore Nayak and Saminathan Ratnapandian

10:25 PM
Care and Maintenance of Textile Products Including Apparel and Protective Clothing
By Rajkishore Nayak and Saminathan Ratnapandian
Care and Maintenance of Textile Products Including Apparel and Protective Clothing

Contents
Series preface......................................................................................................ix
Authors................................................................................................................xi
List of abbreviations....................................................................................... xiii
Chapter 1 Introduction................................................................................... 1
Chapter 2 Cleaning of textile materials..................................................... 3
2.1 Wet cleaning (using water)...................................................................... 4
2.1.1 Washing with a machine........................................................... 5
2.1.2 Washing by hand........................................................................ 7
2.1.3 Washing chemicals................................................................... 10
2.1.4 Other washing aids.................................................................. 14
2.2 Dry cleaning............................................................................................ 16
2.2.1 Dry cleaning solvents............................................................... 17
2.2.2 Other chemicals........................................................................ 18
2.3 Dry cleaning versus wet cleaning........................................................ 19
2.3.1 Bene_ts of wet cleaning........................................................... 19
2.3.2 Limitations of wet cleaning..................................................... 19
2.3.3 Bene_ts of dry cleaning........................................................... 20
2.3.4 Limitations of dry cleaning..................................................... 20
2.4 Drying...................................................................................................... 20
2.5 Pressing.................................................................................................... 23
2.6 Cleaning of protective textiles.............................................................. 24
2.6.1 Cleaning of _re_ghter’s clothing............................................ 28
2.6.2 Cleaning of body armour........................................................ 34
2.6.3 Cleaning of chemical-protective clothing............................. 37
2.6.4 Cleaning of other protective clothing.................................... 40
2.7 Effects of cleaning on clothing properties.......................................... 46
2.7.1 Effects of wet cleaning............................................................. 46
2.7.2 Effects of dry cleaning............................................................. 56
2.7.3 Precautions during dry cleaning........................................... 57
Chapter 3 Equipment for the care of textiles........................................... 59
3.1 Washing equipment............................................................................... 59
3.1.1 Top-loading washing machines............................................. 59
3.1.2 Front-loading washing machines........................................... 62
3.1.3 Top- versus front-loading washing machines...................... 62
3.1.4 Other designs............................................................................ 66
3.1.5 Dry cleaning machines............................................................ 67
3.2 Drying equipment.................................................................................. 68
3.3 Equipment used for pressing................................................................ 69
3.4 Other equipment..................................................................................... 71
Chapter 4 Care labelling.............................................................................. 73
4.1 De_nition of a care label........................................................................ 74
4.2 Terminologies used in care labelling................................................... 75
4.3 Care label requirements........................................................................ 78
4.4 Mandatory regulations.......................................................................... 81
4.5 Processes described by care labels....................................................... 85
4.5.1 Laundering 86
4.5.2 Bleaching 86
4.5.3 Dry cleaning 86
4.5.4 Tumble drying........................................................................... 87
4.5.5 Ironing or pressing................................................................... 87
4.6 Care labelling systems........................................................................... 87
4.6.1 International (ISO) care labelling system.............................. 88
4.6.2 ASTM care labelling system................................................... 90
4.6.3 Canadian care labelling system.............................................. 92
4.6.4 British care labelling system................................................... 93
4.6.5 Australian/New Zealand care labelling system.................. 95
4.6.6 Japanese care labelling system............................................... 98
4.7 Example of care labels............................................................................ 99
4.8 Electronic care labels.............................................................................. 99
4.9 Issues related to care labelling............................................................ 101
Chapter 5 Care instructions for specialty textile items....................... 103
5.1 Carpet and rugs.................................................................................... 104
5.2 Curtains and upholstery material...................................................... 104
5.3 Bed linen................................................................................................ 105
5.4 Other items............................................................................................ 106
5.4.1 Blinds, shutters and awnings................................................ 106
5.4.2 Blankets 107
5.4.3 Leather goods.......................................................................... 107
5.5 Care based on _bre type...................................................................... 108
5.5.1 Cotton items 110
5.5.2 Woollen items...........................................................................111
5.5.3 Silk items 115
5.5.4 Nylon items 116
5.6 Problems during laundering and dry cleaning with solutions......117
Chapter 6 Stains..........................................................................................123
6.1 Types of stains....................................................................................... 123
6.2 Removal of stains.................................................................................. 123
6.3 Impact of stain removal on clothing properties............................... 124
Chapter 7 Storage of clothing...................................................................125
7.1 Apparel textiles..................................................................................... 125
7.2 Storage of personal protection equipment (PPE)............................. 126
Chapter 8 The environmental impact and health hazards of
cleaning......................................................................................129
8.1 Environmental impacts....................................................................... 129
8.1.1 Chemicals with potential hazards....................................... 130
8.1.2 Recent innovations in laundering........................................ 131
8.1.3 Green cleaning........................................................................ 132
8.1.3.1 Ozone laundering.................................................. 134
8.1.3.2 Ultrasonic cleaning................................................ 135
8.1.3.3 Eco-friendly chemicals for laundering............... 137
8.1.3.4 Eco-friendly chemicals for dry cleaning............ 137
8.2 Health hazards...................................................................................... 139
8.2.1 During laundering or dry cleaning..................................... 139
8.2.2 Residual amount left in the clothing................................... 140
8.2.3 Cross-contamination of diseases...........................................141
Chapter 9 Future trends............................................................................. 143
Chapter 10 Conclusions............................................................................... 147
References........................................................................................................ 149
Index 171

Series preface
Textile Institute Professional Publications

The aim of the Textile Institute Professional Publications is to provide support to textile professionals in their work and to help emerging professionals, such as _nal year or masters students, by providing the information needed to gain a sound understanding of key and emerging topics relating to textile, clothing and footwear technology, textile chemistry, materials science and engineering. The books are written by experienced authors with expertise in the topic and all texts are independently reviewed by textile professionals or textile academics.

The textile industry has a history of being both an innovator and an early adopter of a wide variety of technologies. There are textile businesses of some kind operating across the world. At any one time, there is an enormous breadth of sophistication in how such companies might function. In some places where the industry serves only its own local market, design, development and production may continue to be based on traditional techniques; but companies that aspire to operate globally _nd themselves in an intensely competitive environment, some driven by the need to appeal to followers of fast-moving fashion, others by demands for high performance and unprecedented levels of reliability. Textile professionals working within such organisations are subjected to a continued pressing need to introduce new materials and technologies, not only to improve production ef_ciency and reduce costs, but also to enhance the attractiveness and performance of their existing products and to bring new products into being. As a consequence, textile academics and professionals _nd themselves having to continuously improve their understanding of a wide range of new materials and emerging technologies to keep pace with their competitors.

The Textile Institute was formed in 1910 to provide professional support to textile practitioners and academics undertaking research and teaching in the _eld of textiles. The Institute quickly established itself as the professional body for textiles worldwide and now has individual and corporate members in over 80 countries. The Institute works to provide sources of reliable and up-to-date information to support textile professionals through its research journals, the Journal of the Textile Institute [1] and Textile Progress [2], de_nitive descriptions of textiles and their components through its online publication Textile Terms and Definitions [3] and contextual treatments of important topics within the _eld of textiles in the form of self-contained books such as the Textile Institute Professional Publications.

List of abbreviations
AATCC American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists
AOX adsorbable organo-halogen
AS/NZS Australia and New Zealand standard
ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials
BOD biochemical-oxygen demand
CARB California Air Resources Board
CEN Comite Europeen de normalization
COD chemical-oxygen demand
DfE Design for the Environment
DFE directional frictional effect
DP durable press
DPTB dipropylene glycol tertiary butyl ether
DWR durable water repellent
EPA Environmental Protection Agency
FFPPC _re_ghter’s personal protective clothing
FR _ame retardant
FRPPC _ame retardant personal protective clothing
FSP fragment simulating projectile
FTC Federal Trade Commission
FTIR Fourier-transform infrared
GEC GreenEarth Cleaning
ISO International Organization for Standardization
JIS Japan Industrial Standard
LAS linear alkyl benzene sulfonates
NAFTA North American Free Trade Agreement
NFPA National Fire Protection Association
NIJ National Institute of Justice
NPE nonylphenol ethoxylates
OBA optical brightening agents
P/C polyester/cotton
PAC polyacrylic
PBO piperonyl butoxide
PCE (perc) perchloroethylene
PET polyethylene terephthalate
PLA polylactic acid
PLC programmed logic circuit
PPC personal protective clothing
PU polyurethane
PVC polyvinyl chloride
REACH Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of
Chemicals
RFID radio frequency identi_cation
RH relative humidity
SPF sun protection factor
UBACS Under Body Armor Combat Shirt
UHMWPE ultra-high molecular weight poly ethylene
UV ultraviolet
VOC volatile organic compound


Read “Care and Maintenance of Textile Products Including Apparel and Protective Clothing” as PDF
How to Get Book? To get any book you can send Email: textileebooks@gmail.com

Share this

Related Posts

Previous
Next Post »