Encyclopaedic Dictionary of Textile Terms, Volume IV by Mathews Kolanjikombil

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Encyclopaedic Dictionary of Textile Terms, Volume IV
By Mathews Kolanjikombil
Encyclopaedic Dictionary of Textile Terms, Volume IV

Contents
Preface vii
Volume I
1. A 1
2. B 99
3. C 222
Volume II
4. D 409
5. E 511
6. F 552
7. G 659
8. H 704
9. I 761
10. J 794
Volume III
11. K 811
12. L 834
13. M 889
14. N 975
15. O 1006
16. P 1034
17. Q 1160
18. R 1165
Volume IV
19. S 1227
20. T 1405
21. U 1494
22. V 1507
23. W 1532
24. X 1586
25. Y 1588
26. Z 1605

S

S Twist: See Direction of twist.

SA 8000: Social standards in textiles and clothing by Social Accountability International.

S-Finish: A term originally applied to the partial surface saponification. A term originally applied to the partial surface saponification of cellulose ester fibres (acetate and triacetate) by alkaline hydrolysis to reduce static charge and improve fabric handle. Alkali treatment of polyester. Nowadays the term has also been adopted for an analogous treatment of polyester fibres in which a controlled partial saponification with alkali (NaOH) is carried out to achieve a silk-like lustre and handle, reduce the buildup of static charges and improve anti-soil properties.

Sable: French for mottled effect.

Sable: A dark brown luxury fur which is very hard wearing.

Sabretache: A leather pocket hung from the left side of the sword hilt; a popinjay ornament.

Sabrina: Applique needlework, the leaves and petals of flowers made of coloured material edged with button hole stitches.

SABS: South African Bureau of Standards

Sacharilla Mull: A very delicate bleached cotton muslin, made of fine yarn with a low construction. It is given a very soft finish. Used for veils and turbans by the Moslems.

Sack: A business coat with pockets, made single and double breasted; a loose Chesterfield overcoat.

Sack Cloth: Very coarse cotton or jute fabric, woven plain, used for bags.

Sacking: See Bagging and Heavy goods. (1) Heavy, three or four end twill jute or hemp cloth of double warp and single filling, used for cement and ore bags; (2) Solid coloured flannels for kimonos.

Saddening: Same as after treating.

Saddlecloth: In Arizona and Mexico masses of aloe fibre spread out in regular thickness and tacked to keep them in place. It is not woven.

Sadin: In the Bible means linen cloth.

Sadowa: Woollen dress goods with the nap being raised in circles, dots, squares, etc.

Safety Data Sheets: The ETAD (Ecological and Toxicological Association of the Dyestuffs Manufacturing Industry) has been issuing safety data sheets to affiliated dyestuff manufacturers since 1974 in order to support these efforts to protect environment and to provide information on the regulations to be complied with, details of the physical, toxicological and ecological properties, together with handling, transport, storage and safety aspects. The ETAD (Ecological and Toxicological Association of the Dyestuffs Manufacturing Industry) has been issuing safety data sheets to affiliated dyestuff manufacturers since 1974 in order to support these efforts and to provide information on the regulations to be complied with, details of the physical, toxicological and ecological properties, together with handling, transport, storage and safety aspects. The ecological details are listed under point 8 in the SDS, i.e. whether substances are biodegradable, toxic to fish, harmful to waste water bacteria, and de ails of the water pollutant toxicity classification of the product. More information concerning the exact chemical composition of the products, proper disposal and the by-product level present will be desired in future. If the content of the safety data sheet should change within twelve months of delivery, the supplier must automatically forward the client an updated version of the safety data sheet.

Safety stitch: A stitch formed by an over edge stitch reinforced by a chain stitch (or sometimes a lockstitch) further in from the material edge.

Safety valve: A pressure relief valve actuated by inlet static pressure and characterized by rapid opening or ‘pop’ up action.

Saffron: A fugitive yellow dyestuff derived from the flowers of the crocus; used formerly to some extent.

Sales invoices: Invoices of the goods sold.

Sail Cloth: A firm fabric in plain colours in plain or basket weave. It is made from cotton, or polyester and cotton, and is stiff and hard wearing. Used for trousers, dresses, children’s clothes, men’s summer jackets etc.

Sail test: Combined wear and laboratory test for Static charge. A test subject wearing a waist slip made from the fabric to be tested passes a polyester sail fixed in an air conditioning chamber. The slip rubs against the sail and is charged. A second person assesses and records the charging and discharging per unit of time.

Sailcloth: A canvas/duck that is used for the manufacture of sails. Dense and tight, impregnated heavy fabric (linen, cotton, hemp, synthetic fibres) in plain weave. Used for tarpaulins, awnings, sails, window blinds, etc. Laminated fabrics are also finding use in this market.

Sail duck: See Duck.

Saint Andrew: In embroidery a stitch forming a St. Andrew cross in a square.

Saint Georges: Unbleached French linen of medium quality.

Saint Jago: Cotton goods in Sierra Leone, Africa.

Saint Jean: Coarse, unbleached French linen made in various widths.

Saint Lucie: Very fine French silk yarn.

Saint Maur: French serge made of pure silk or mixed with wool.

Saint Nicolas: French woollen serge, used by the army.

Saint Omer: Narrow, 17th century English worsted fabric.

Saint Rambert: Unbleached French linen.

Saint Remy: A grade of French organzine or raw silk.

Saint Vincent: Variety of raw cotton from the West Indies.

Sakalleridis: Valuable Egyptian Maco cotton.

Salampore: The tough fabric made in Nellore, India as work wear. Salampores were the preferred dress material for the slaves on the West Indian Plantations. But the West Indian Emancipation Act of 1833 sounded the the death knell of salampores, as “freed negroes refused, very naturally, to wear the grab of their slavery.

Salisbury: White Sort of white English woollen flannel.

Salt: An ionic compound that is formed by a neutralization reaction (reaction of an acid with a base) The best known salt, common salt, or sodium chloride (NaCl) is extensively used as an electrolyte in dyeing. Sodium sulphate is also used for this purpose. Many of the chemicals used in dyeing are technically salts, including many dyes.

Salt accumulation: When recycling e.g. rinsing water which is sometimes still cleaned in in-house waste water treatment plants, the salts remain dissolved in the water and are not removed. When the recycled water is reused as process or rinsing water, more salt is added to the salt concentration already present from the first use of the water. If part or all of the water is used several times, the salt water concentration continues to increase imperceptibly and may become a source of interference.


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