Foundations and Applications of MIS: A Model Theory Approach By Yasuhiko Takahara, Yongmei Liu

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Foundations and Applications of MIS: A Model Theory Approach
By Yasuhiko Takahara, Yongmei Liu

Contents
Preface
Part I New Paradigm of Systems Development
1 New Systems Development Methodology: The Model Theory Approach 3
1.1 Necessity for a New Systems Development Methodology for
Management Information Systems 3
1.2 Outline of Model Theory Approach 5
1.3 Example of Model Theory Approach to Systems Development 12
Appendix 1.1 User Model in extProlog Generated by Setcompiler:
Pattern-Finding Problem 17
Appendix 1.2 User Model in extProlog Generated by Manual:
Pattern-Fitting Problem 18
Part II Model Construction Language and Systems Implementation Language
2 Computer-Acceptable Set Theory for Model Construction 23
2.1 Implementation Structure of User Model in Computer-Acceptable
Set Theory 23
2.2 Well-Formed Formula of First-Order Predicate Calculus 24
2.3 Basic Notation for Computer-Acceptable Set Theory 25
2.4 Sets 27
2.5 Predicate (Relation) 29
2.6 Functions 30
2.7 User Model Description in Set Theory 34
2.8 User Model Compilation 36
2.9 Input-Output Operations in Set Theory 39
Appendix 2.1 System-Defined Predicates and Functions Used in This Book 39
3. Implementation Language: extProlog* 43
3.1 Extended Prolog (extProlog) 43
3.2 Examples 45
3.3 Basic Syntax 52
3.4 extProlog as General-Purpose Programming Language 53
3.5 Graphical User Interface in extProlog 59
3.6 Execution Speed of extProlog 59
Appendix 3.1 Graphical User Interface in extProlog 60
Part III Model Theory Approach to Solver Systems Development
4 Model Theory Approach to Solver System Development: Outlines 67
4.1 Model Theory Approach to extSLV Development 67
4.2 Design Procedure of extSLV 73
4.3 Classification of Problems for extSLV 74
4.4 Implementation Structure of extSLV 75
5 User Model and Standardized Goal-Seeker* 79
5.1 User Model for the E-C-C Case 79
5.2 User Model for I-O-O Case 83
5.3 Standardized Goal-Seeker by Modified Dynamic Programming
Method 86
5.4 Standardized Goal-Seeker by Hill Climbing with Push-Down
Stack Method 91
Appendix 5.1 Standard DP Solver 99
Appendix 5.2 Standard DP Solver 102
Appendix 5.3 Proof of Proposition 5.1 106
Appendix 5.4 Proof of Proposition 5.2 106
Appendix 5.5 Proof of Proposition 5.3 106
Appendix 5.6 Proof of Proposition 5.4 106
Appendix 5.7 Proof of Proposition 5.5 107
Appendix 5.8 Proof of Theorem 5.3 107
Appendix 5.9 Proof of Proposition 5.6 107
Appendix 5.10 Proof of Proposition 5.7 108
Appendix 5.11 Proof of Theorem 5.4 108
Appendix 5.12 Proof of Proposition 5.8 108
Part IV Solver System Applications
6 Traveling Salesman Problem: E-C-C Problem 113
6.1 Traveling Salesman Problem 113
6.2 User Model of Traveling Salesman Problem for DP Goal-Seeker . . . 113
6.3 Implementation in extProlog 117
6.4 Tuning of Goal-Seeker 118
Appendix 6.1 User Model for Traveling Salesman Problem 119
7 Regulation Problem: E-O-C Problem 127
7.1 Regulation Problem 127
7.2 User Model of Regulation Problem for PD Goal-Seeker 129
7.3 Implementation in extProlog 133
7.4 Validity of PD Method for Regulation Problem 135
7.5 Feedback Law Problem and Case-Based Reasoning 136
Appendix 7.1 User Model for Regulation Problem 137
Appendix 7.2 Chinese Checkers Problem 138
8 Linear Quadratic Optimization Problem: E-C-O and E-O-O Problems. 145
8.1 Linear Quadratic Optimization Problem 145
8.2 User Model of Linear Quadratic Optimization Problem for PD
Goal-Seeker 146
8.3 Implementation in extProlog 149
Appendix 8.1 User Model for Linear Quadratic Optimization Problem 150
9 Cube Root Problem: I-C-C Problem 153
9.1 Cube Root Problem 153
9.2 User Model of Cube Root Problem for PD Goal-Seeker 153
9.3 Implementation in extProlog 156
9.4 Tuning of PD Goal-Seeker for Cube Root Problem 156
Appendix 9.1 User Model for Cube Root Problem 156
10 Knapsack Problem: I-C-O Problem 159
10.1 Knapsack Problem 159
10.2 User Model of Knapsack Problem for PD Goal-Seeker 160
10.3 Implementation in extProlog 164
10.4 Tuning of PD Goal-Seeker for Knapsack Problem 165
Appendix 10.1 User Model for Knapsack Problem 166
11 Class Schedule Problem: I-O-C Problem 169
11.1 Class Schedule Problem 169
11.2 User Model of Class Schedule Problem for PD Goal-Seeker 169
11.3 Implementation in extProlog 174
11.4 Tuning of PD Goal-Seeker for Class Schedule Problem 176
Appendix 11.1 User Model for Class Schedule Problem 176
12 Data Mining Problem: I-O-O Problem 183
12.1 Data Mining Problem 183
12.2 User Model of Data Mining Problem for PD Goal-Seeker 184
12.3 Implementation in extProlog 195
12.4 Tuning of PD Goal-Seeker for Data Mining Problem* 196
Appendix 12.1 User Model for Data Mining Problem 198
13 Task Skeleton Model: Intelligent Data Mining System* 207
13.1 General Concept of Problem-Solving System 207
13.2 Task Skeleton Model 210
13.3 Intelligent Data Mining System 213
Part V Model Theory Approach to Transaction Processing Systems Development
14 Transaction Processing System on Browser-Based Standardized User
Interface 225
14.1 Model Theory Approach to Transaction Processing System:
Canonical Structure 226
14.2 Realization Structure of BMIS: File System 230
14.3 Atomic Process and Relational Structure of User Model 233
14.4 Dynamic Process of modTPS 235
14.5 Development Procedure for TPS Using the Implementation
Structure of the User Model 236
14.6 User Model Construction: Example 238
14.7 Operation of Compiled User Model 243
Appendix 14.1 Derivation of Canonical Representation of BMIS* 245
Appendix 14.2 Derivation of Realization Structure of BMIS on File System* 250
Appendix 14.3 External User Interface* 256
15 Browser-Based Intelligent Management Information System:
Temporary Staff Recruitment System 259
15.1 Systems Specification 259
15.2 DFD for Specification and Browser-Based Intelligent MIS 260
15.3 TPS Development for Employment System 262
15.4 Data Transformation System 267
15.5 Solver Development: Jobarrange 269
15.6 Operation of Employment System 273
Appendix 15.1 Transaction Processing Part of Employment System in
Computer-Acceptable Set Theory 276
Appendix 15.2 Data Transformation and Solver Parts of Employment
System in Computer-Acceptable Set Theory 282
16 Database Connectivity for the Model Theory Approach"^ 287
16.1 Database Connectivity in extProlog 287
16.2 OODB Language 288
16.3 Implementation of OODB Language 293
16.4 SQL and OODB Languages 297
16.5 Database Connection to Model Theory Approach 310
Appendix 16.1 Proof of Theorem 16.1 315
Appendix 16.2 Database-Handling Model in Computer-Acceptable Set
Theory 319
Part VI Theoretical Basis for extProlog
17 extProlog as Logic Programming Language* 325
17.1 Prolog as Logic Programming Language 325
17.2 Predicate Calculus 327
17.3 Special Forms 330
17.4 Theorem Proving in Prolog 332
17.5 Theorem Proving by Resolution Principle 335
Appendix 17.1 Proof of Theorem 17.1 340
Appendix 17.2 Proof of Theorem 17.2 341
Appendix 17.3 Proof of Theorem 17.3 341
18 Implementation of extProlog* 343
18.1 Implementation of extProlog: Generalized PDA (Push-Down
Automaton) Model 343
Index 355


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