Advances in Productive, Safe, and Responsible Coal Mining PDF by Joseph Hirschi

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Advances in Productive, Safe, and Responsible Coal Mining
By Joseph Hirschi
Advances in Productive, Safe, and Responsible Coal Mining

Contents
Contributors ix
Preface xi
1 Profitable coal mining means being productive, safe, and environmentally responsible 1
Joseph C. Hirschi, Aaron S. Young
1.1 Foundations of profitability 1
1.2 Statistical comparison of safety versus productivity 2
1.3 Importance of environmental responsibility 5
1.4 Achieving profitability 7
References 8

2 Safety and productivity in coal mining—How to make both the top priority 11
R. Larry Grayson
2.1 Introduction 11
2.2 Coal mine safety and productivity: 1901–2015 11
2.3 Evolution of the role of the US federal safety and health enforcement agency 21
2.4 Evolution of safety practices at mines and plants since 1969 24
2.5 Making productivity and safety linked priorities 26
2.6 Conclusion 28
2.7 Future trends 28
References 29

3 Zero Harm coal mining 31
Tom Hethmon
3.1 Introduction 31
3.2 Zero Harm 33
3.3 Coal-mining history 36
3.4 Zero Harm framework 38
3.5 Coal-mining risk 39
3.6 Risk management and acceptable risk 41
3.7 Regulation and legislation 44
3.8 Culture 47
3.9 Leadership 48
3.10 Conclusion and future trends 48
References 49
Further reading 51

4 Productive, safe, and responsible operations are not possible without visible safety leadership 53
Lori Guasta, David R. Lauriski
4.1 Who is a safety leader? 53
4.2 Culture is “the way we do things around here” 53
4.3 Promoting a safety culture 55
4.4 Applying the push-pull concept 57
4.5 Health and safety maturity model 57
4.6 A roadmap to develop visible safety leaders 58
4.7 Summary 60
References 61

5 Optimization of coal recovery and production rate as a function of panel dimensions 63
Kwame Awuah-Offei, Angelina Anani, Joseph C. Hirschi,
Emmanuel Ewusie
5.1 Introduction 63
5.2 Panel width and production rate 65
5.3 Maximizing recovery as a cutting stock problem 74
5.4 Conclusions and recommendations 80
References 81

6 Mine ventilation networks optimized for safety and productivity 83
J€urgen F. Brune
6.1 Introduction 83
6.2 Mine ventilation network design and planning 85
6.3 Mine air quality and dust monitoring 85
6.4 Ventilation of continuous miner faces and sections in coal mines 86
6.5 Belt ventilation and dust control 88
6.6 Ventilation of longwall faces in coal mines 89
6.7 Mine fire and explosion prevention, refuge chambers 92
6.8 Ventilation network planning for metal and nonmetal mines 96
6.9 Air cooling and refrigeration 96
6.10 Summary and conclusions 97
References 98
Additional references 99
7 Developing effective proximity detection systems for underground
coal mines 101
Joseph DuCarme
7.1 Introduction 101
7.2 Fatal accidents at underground coal mines 101
7.3 Technologies for PDS in underground applications 102
7.4 NIOSH research on magnetic-based proximity 106
7.5 Development of intelligent proximity detection (iPD) 113
7.6 Future developments 117
References 118
8 Communication and tracking system performance 121
Steven J. Schafrik
8.1 Introduction 121
8.2 Measures of tracking system performance 121
8.3 Simulation of tracking system performance 123
8.4 Measurement of tracking system performance 141
8.5 Conclusions 153
Acknowledgments 154
9 Out-of-seam dilution: Economic impacts and control strategies 155
Joseph C. Hirschi, Y. Paul Chugh
9.1 Introduction and background 155
9.2 Experimental modeling of an OSD control procedure 158
9.3 Modeling results 162
9.4 Controlling OSD 168
9.5 Conclusions and recommendations 175
Acknowledgment 176
References 177
10 Coal mine methane: Control, utilization, and abatement 179
Satar Mahdevari
10.1 Introduction 179
10.2 Coal mine methane 181
10.3 Methane emission control in coal mines 185
10.4 CMM utilization 192
10.5 CMM abatement 193
10.6 Economics of CMM recovery 195
10.7 Conclusion 196
References 197
11 Diesel particulate matter: Monitoring and control improves
safety and air quality 199
Muhammad Usman Khan, Argyle Douglas Stewart Gillies
11.1 Diesel use in mining 199
11.2 DPM characteristics 200
11.3 DPM health effects 200
11.4 Regulatory impact on underground mines diesel equipment 201
11.5 US DPM regulations and permissible exposure
limits (PELs) 202
11.6 DPM exposure measurements 203
11.7 Controlling DPM in mines 206
11.8 Summary and conclusions 209
References 209
12 Engineered noise controls for miner safety and environmental
responsibility 215
Hugo E. Camargo, Amanda S. Azman, J. Shawn Peterson
12.1 Background 215
12.2 Approaches to noise control 215
12.3 Current technology 216
12.4 Case studies 220
12.5 Conclusions 240
References 241
13 Sustainable coal waste disposal practices 245
Joseph C. Hirschi, Y. Paul Chugh
13.1 Introduction and background information 245
13.2 Sustainable coal waste disposal practices of the future 251
13.3 Summary 266
References 267
14 Sustainable reclamation and water management practices 271
Jeff Skousen, Carl E. Zipper, Louis M. McDonald, Jason A. Hubbart,
Paul F. Ziemkiewicz
14.1 Introduction 271
14.2 Legal and regulatory context 272
14.3 Reclamation practices 275
14.4 Water management during and after mining 291
14.5 Conclusion 295
References 296
Further reading 302
15 The role of research in the coal-mining industry: Moving forward
using lessons from the past 303
Joseph C. Hirschi
15.1 Introduction and background 303
15.2 Why research is important 304
15.3 Major accomplishments in coal research 305
15.4 Research logistics and funding 309
15.5 Coal’s challenge: Mission impossible or a bright future 311
References 311
Index 313

Preface
When I, Joseph Hirschi, began my first postcollege job working at an underground coal mine, the newly hired, inexperienced miner, 40h training I was required to complete included a tour of the mine complex. One of the stops was where the mainline conveyor belt transferred to the slope belt. The entire mine production passed this point on its way to the surface. This area was kept in immaculate condition with fresh rock dust on the roof, floor, and ribs; there were no spills at transfer points and no float dust underneath belt rollers or on the framework. This was mostly the work of one man, Jack Webb. His primary responsibility was to keep this area clean. Posted on the guarding around the drive motors were hand-painted signs with quotes attributed to Mr. Webb. One read, “A Clean Mine is a Safe Mine.” Another read, “A Safe Mine is a Productive Mine.” When I first read them, they merely seemed like nice clich_es, yet over the course of my career, I have observed and learned the profound truths that they proclaimed. This book expresses that learning in engineering or scientific terms thanks to the contributions of the expert authors, who are specialists in the areas of coal mine operations including productivity, safety, and environmental stewardship. I’m proud to consider them my colleagues and peers and to call them my friends.

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