Contemporary Case Studies on Fashion Production, Marketing and Operations PDF by Pui-Sze Chow, Chun-Hung Chiu, Amy C. Y. Yip, Ailie K. Y. Tang

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Contemporary Case Studies on Fashion Production, Marketing and Operations
By Pui-Sze Chow, Chun-Hung Chiu, Amy C. Y. Yip, Ailie K. Y. Tang
Contemporary Case Studies on Fashion Production, Marketing and Operations

Preface
The fashion industry is amongst the largest industries in the world. The global fashion market contributes a huge amount of GDP and employs a majority of people in many countries; thus it has pivotal impacts on the global economy. Apart from the volatile demand and fast-moving fashion trends, the dynamics of the industry is constantly affected by the advancement in technology and the ever-changing concerns from the consumers such as sustainability. Whereas continuous investigation and theory development advances the knowledge to tackle the up and coming issues in such a dynamic business environment, the study and reporting of real-world cases help illustrate the application aspect of those theories and generate further insights. A number of real cases in the fashion industry, such as the business model of the fast fashion brand Zara, and the innovative social media marketing approach of the traditional luxury brand Burberry, have even become benchmark textbook examples in the respective disciplines.

In the existing pool of literature, case studies in fashion business are usually documented according to some specific topics. Apparently, there is a lack of a comprehensive collection of examples that relates to the various contemporary issues encountered by the fashion industry. In light of this, we have edited this volume which features a number of case studies to illustrate the different challenges pertinent to the sector nowadays and to showcase the respective state-of-the-art solutions.

This edited volume includes thirteen chapters with diversified topics and geographical contexts (Table 1). According to the nature of the topics, they are organized in four parts, namely: (I) Fashion Production, (II) Fashion Branding and Marketing, (III) Fashion Operations, and (IV) Sustainability and the Fashion Industry.

Part I: Case Studies on Fashion Production
Fashion production has always been facing different challenges owing to the very nature of the fashion products. Quick response is critical to the ever-changing preferences of the end-consumer market. Stringent cost control is necessary for profitability. Use of technology for product innovation and process efficiency offers competitive advantages.

Over the decades, it has been a common practice for fashion brands to outsource the manufacturing process to overseas suppliers (e.g. those in China, Bangladesh, and Mexico) for cheaper production of garments in large volume. Recently, there has been advocates for domestic production in light of the demand for quicker response and sustainability concern. In Chap. 1, Harris presents a study on domestic manufacturing and sourcing in the US apparel industry. Based on the findings of five case studies, the author discusses the niche of domestic apparel manufacturing. A “domestic and balanced sourcing model” is proposed that summarizes the various factors of competitiveness for domestic apparel production.

In Chap. 2, Fung and Choi examine the product development process in the fashion industry with reference to a case study of an international luxury fashion brand. Comparing its approach to product development with that commonly adopted by fashion trading companies in Hong Kong, the authors discuss the implications and provide suggestions to improve the practices of the latter.

In Chap. 3, Yuan, Chen and Luzzi presents a comprehensive review of the use of laser in different areas throughout the apparel production process, from fabric cutting, engraving, to fault detection and inventory management. Illustrated with examples the authors discuss the merits of the application of laser and highlight its potential to enhance environmental sustainability and innovations in apparel production.

Part II: Case Studies on Fashion Branding and Marketing
Branding and marketing play a paramount role to the success of a fashion brand. Proper branding and marketing strategies help a brand to stand out from the competitors and reach the target end-consumers. In Chap. 4, McColl, Canning, Shearer, and McBride explores the branding issue of vintage fashion retail brands. Based on the case studies of three vintage retailers in Glasgow, UK, the authors discuss the various elements that help enhance the positioning and operations of vintage fashion retail brands, including brand story creation, online communications with customers, and personalized customer services.

In Chap. 5, Runfola, Ranfagni and Guercini examine internationalization of Italian family-owned luxury brands. Through the case study on Missoni, one of the internationally reputed luxury brands, the authors discuss the challenges faced by the Italian small-medium-sized family-owned luxury fashion companies nowadays. They conclude four key assets in managing the internationalization process of this type of luxury family business.

With the booming economy and improved living standard of the people, China has emerged as a very promising market for many western luxury brands. Yet socio-cultural factors may significantly affect the successful entrance of these brands in China. In Chap. 6, Rovai investigates the different branding and digitalization strategies adopted by three European luxury brands to enter into the Chinese market. Observed from these cases, the author emphasizes appropriate “luxury digitalization” strategy as the key to successful market positioning in China.

Working in a market-driven industry, it is crucial for fashion companies to keep updated with the consumers’ needs and preferences. With the ease of access to mobile technology, email survey has become a convenient way to collect consumers’ opinions. In Chap. 7, Wu and Tso presents an email survey project by a mass market fashion retailer to solicit consumers’ perception towards the brand. The authors identify several good practices and discuss various considerations in conducting email survey for fashion retailers.

Contents
Part I Cases on Fashion Production
1 USA Apparel Manufacturing and Domestic Sourcing . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Carol Elizabeth Harris
2 Product Development Process of an International Luxury
Fashion Brand: Implications to Hong Kong Fashion Trading and
Manufacturing Companies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Yi-Ning Fung and Tsan-Ming Choi
3 Application of Laser Technology in Fashion Industry . . . . . . . . . . 43
Guoxiang Yuan, Zhuoming Chen and Domenico Luzzi
Part II Cases on Fashion Branding and Marketing
4 Vintage Fashion Retailing: Building the Store Brand . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Julie McColl, Catherine Canning, Linda Shearer and Louise McBride
5 The Internationalization of Italian Luxury Brands.
The Missoni Case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Andrea Runfola, Silvia Ranfagni and Simone Guercini
6 Luxury Branding and Digitalisation: The Case of European
Brands in China . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Serena Rovai
7 Good Practices and Considerations in Conducting Email Survey
for Fashion Retail Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Chi Wai Wu and Kwok Fai Geoffrey Tso
Part III Cases on Fashion Retailing and Operations
8 The Key Role of Retail Stores in Fast Fashion Companies: The
H&M Case Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Elisa Arrigo
9 Fashion Business Case Study on the German
Click & Collect Situation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Peter Bug, Natalie Gordon and Ann-Sophie Staudenmaier
10 Supply Chain Strategic Fit: Two Fashion-Renting Cases . . . . . . . . 165
Xiangyu Lai, Shiting Song, Yaqing Xu and Chun-Hung Chiu
Part IV Cases on Sustainability and Fashion Industry
11 Sustainable Innovation in the Apparel Supply Chain:
Case Study on TAL Apparel Limited . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Jiyoung Kim and Marissa Zorola
12 Sustainable Development in the Supplier Chain: Analysis
of a Brazilian Fashion Retailer’s Social Responsibility
Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Rita de Cássia Lopes Moro, Francisca Dantas Mendes
and João Amato Neto
13 Towards Closed-Loop Fashion Supply Chains—Reflections
from Retailer-Facilitated Used Apparel Collection
Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Pui-Sze Chow and Cinty K. Y. Li
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241

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