Hybrid Composite Precast Systems: Numerical Investigation to Construction PDF by Won-Kee Hong

7:56 PM
Hybrid Composite Precast Systems: Numerical Investigation to Construction
By Won-Kee Hong
Hybrid Composite Precast Systems: Numerical Investigation to Construction

Contents
Preface ix
1. Conventional precast assembly
1.1 Review of conventional precast concrete structures 1
1.1.1 Why precast concrete? 1
1.1.2 Quality control and facile installation 1
1.2 Conventional precast connection 1
1.2.1 Column-to-column connection 1
1.2.2 Beam-to-column connection 8
1.3 Suggestion for the improvement of the precast joints 12
1.3.1 Use of the cast-in-place concrete 12
1.3.2 Why steel-concrete hybrid composite precast frames? Use of steel-concrete hybrid precast frames with reduced frame weight implementing dry mechanical joints having bolted laminated plates 12
References 14

2. Experimental investigation of the precast concrete and the precast steel-concrete hybrid composite frames having novel mechanical joints
2.1 Conventional bolted endplates used for steel frames 15
2.2 Description of the mechanical joints 16
2.2.1 Joint connection from an erection point of view 16
2.2.2 Column-to-column joint for the moment connections 16
2.2.3 Beam-to-column joint for the moment connections 19
2.3 Design of the mechanical joints 20
2.3.1 Column-to-column connection 20
2.3.2 Beam-to-column connection and the design of the stiffness of the column plates and bolts 28
2.4 Verification of the structural performance of the joint via the numerical investigation 28
2.5 Experimental investigation of the structural performance of the columnto- column connections 28
2.5.1 Steel-concrete composite columns 28
2.5.2 Concrete columns without steel sections 54
2.5.3 Conclusions of the column-tocolumn connections 64
2.6 Experimental investigation of the structural performance of the beam-tocolumn connections 64
2.6.1 Steel-concrete hybrid composite beams 64
2.6.2 Conclusions of the beam-tocolumn connections 77
2.7 Test assembly 77
2.7.1 Significance of the connection 77
2.7.2 Assembly of the full-scale precast columns 77
2.7.3 Test assembly: Precast column splice implementing the mechanical joints having laminated metal plates 77
2.7.4 Test assembly 79
References 88

3. The investigation of the structural
performance of the hybrid composite
precast frames with mechanical joints
based on nonlinear finite element
analysis
3.1 Numerical investigation of the structural
performance 89
3.1.1 Nonlinear inelastic finite element
analysis 89
3.1.2 FEA parameters and their physical
meanings 91
3.1.3 Dilation angle 94
3.1.4 Fracture criterion 103
3.1.5 Penetration of contact element 105
3.1.6 Modeling technique; types of contact
elements in FEA 108
3.2 Nonlinear finite element analysis of
hybrid composite precast columns spliced
by a mechanical metal plate 113
3.2.1 Finite element models for the
mechanical joints with laminated plates 113
3.2.2 Numerical investigation of metal
plates with high-yield strength
steel splicing precast concrete
columns 138
3.3 Nonlinear finite element analysis of the
beam-to-column connections with
mechanical metal plates for concrete/
steel-concrete composite frame 151
3.3.1 Finite element models for fully and
partially restrained moment
connections 151
References 176
4. L-type hybrid precast frames with
mechanical joints using laminated
metal plates
4.1 Experimental investigation of the L-type
hybrid precast frames using mechanical
joints with laminated metal plates 179
4.1.1 Why L-type precast frames? 179
4.1.2 Specimen details and test
preparation of Specimens
LC1–LC3 179
4.1.3 Preparation of the test 180
4.1.4 Experimental investigations 183
4.1.5 Conclusion 193
4.2 Nonlinear finite element analyses of the
L-type columns with mechanical joints 195
4.2.1 Selection of the elements and discretization 195
4.2.2 Defining interactions; surface-tosurface contact 196
4.2.3 Definition of the host, embedded
elements, and constraints 198
4.2.4 FE models with a foundation; load
application at a test center 198
4.2.5 Structural behavior of laminated
metal plates 203
4.2.6 FE models without foundations 206
4.2.7 Strain evolution of L-type
columns (monolithic and mechanical
joints with no axial force)
with/without foundation 206
4.2.8 Conclusions 209
4.3 Design verification of the beam-column
frames 214
4.3.1 Nonlinear numerical model 214
4.3.2 Design verification 219
4.3.3 Conclusion 226
4.4 Test erection 228
4.4.1 Erection of irregular L-shaped
frames 228
4.4.2 Conclusion 240
References 247
5. Novel erection of the precast frames
using interlocking mechanical
couplers
5.1 Significance of the precast erection
using interlocking mechanical joints 249
5.2 Assembly of the full-scale precast frame
by interlocking couplers 249
5.2.1 Column-to-column connections 249
5.2.2 Girder-to-column connections and
the test erection 256
5.3 Numerical investigation 264
5.3.1 Description of the mechanical
connections for design
verification 264
5.3.2 Finite element model of the
proposed joint 268
5.3.3 Verification of the numerical
analysis 268
5.3.4 Flexural capacity of the connection 271
5.3.5 Conclusions 274
References 274
6. Novel precast frame for facile construction of low-rise buildings using mechanically assembled joint to replace conventional monolithic concrete frame
6.1 Introduction 275
6.1.1 Advantages and challenges 275
6.1.2 Methodology of joint details for lowrise
frames; connections for columnto-
column, column-to-girder, and
girder-to-beam 275
6.2 Design of the building with the
mechanical joints 277
6.2.1 Design load combination and
conventional design detail 277
6.2.2 Design of mechanically layered
plates based on nonlinear finite
element analysis 278
6.2.3 Numerical model and nonlinear
finite element analysis parameters 280
6.2.4 Design of connection plates 280
6.2.5 Implementation of the extended
endplates in girder-to-beam 286
6.2.6 Implementation of the extended
endplates in column-to-girder
connections 291
6.3 Design verification 292
6.3.1 Rates of strain increase and strain
activation of the structural
components at connection 292
6.3.2 Construction quantities 297
6.3.3 Reduction of construction period by
mechanical connection 297
6.3.4 Reduction of energy consumption
and CO2 emissions with the new
precast frame 298
6.4 Results and conclusions 299
References 300
7. Novel pipe rack frames with rigid
joints
7.1 Overview of the pipe rack frames
introduced in this chapter 301
7.1.1 The innovated pipe rack frames 301
7.1.2 Overall historical development,
advantages and challenges of
existing pipe rack frames 301
7.1.3 Significance of the pipe rack frames
with rigid joints; motivations and
objectives 302
7.2 Novel pipe rack frames with rigid joints 304
7.2.1 Precast concrete-based pipe rack
frames with rigid monolithic beamcolumn
connections 304
7.2.2 Precast concrete-based pipe rack
frames with rigid mechanical joints 304
7.2.3 Pipe-racks with prestressed frames 314
7.2.4 Rigid steel frames 314
7.3 Case study 314
7.3.1 Steel-concrete hybrid composite
precast frames with moment
connections 314
7.3.2 Dynamic characteristics 321
7.3.3 Suggestion for rapid construction
based on the fast track using the
proposed frames 321
7.3.4 Structural savings 321
7.3.5 Offsite modular construction
with base template 328
7.4 Conclusions 329
References 329
8. Application to the modular
construction
8.1 Overview of the modular construction
for low-rise buildings 331
8.2 Conventional modular construction 331
8.2.1 Structural and connection systems 331
8.2.2 Cellular-type modules and intramodule
connection 331
8.2.3 Inter-module connection 331
8.2.4 Application of the modular
construction to high-rise buildings 332
8.3 Implementation of the mechanical joints
in precast connections for modular
construction 334
8.3.1 High-rise building application 334
8.3.2 Application to special structures 336
8.4 Lateral stability of the hybrid composite
precast frames with rigid mechanical
joints 338
8.4.1 Seismic responses and
fundamental period of the modular
building 338
8.4.2 Modular steel building with braced
frames 340
8.4.3 Precast concrete-based frames
having mechanical joints 340
8.5 Conclusions 345
References 345

9. Precast steel-concrete hybrid composite structural frames with monolithic joints
9.1 Why the precast steel-concrete hybrid composite with monolithic joints? 348
9.2 Structural behavior of the hybrid composite beams with monolithic joints 352
9.2.1 Wide steel flanges encased in concrete; the interaction between steel and concrete 352
9.2.2 T-shaped steel section encased in concrete 355
9.2.3 Seismic capacity of the hybrid precast beams 373
9.2.4 Prestressed precast beam monolithically integrated with columns 376
9.2.5 Discussions and conclusions 377
9.3 Analytical prediction of the nonlinear structural behavior of the steel-concrete hybrid composite structures 382
9.3.1 Conventional strain compatibility approach 382
9.3.2 Steel-concrete hybrid composite beams without axial loads 383
9.4 Assembly of the steel beam-column joints with a skewed beam section 402
9.4.1 Conventional steel erection 402
9.4.2 New erection method; splicing plates and bolting beyond critical path 402
9.4.3 Precast column spliced by the rebars extended in holes 409
9.5 Application of the hybrid composite precast frames with the beam depth reduction capability to high-rise buildings 411
9.5.1 Application to a 19-story building 411
9.5.2 Erection and assembly of the hybrid composite beams 416
9.5.3 Descriptions of the selected buildings 419
9.6 Contributions 419
References 426

10. Artificial-intelligence-based design of the ductile precast concrete beams
10.1 Concept and structure of the artificial neural networks 427
10.1.1 Analogy with the biological neuron model 427
10.1.2 ANNs for structural engineering 427
10.2 Multilayer perception 427
10.2.1 Weights and bias 427
10.2.2 Backpropagation by adjusting weights 428
10.2.3 Activation functions related to the structural-engineering applications 430
10.2.4 Initialization 433
10.2.5 Data normalization 433
10.2.6 Three ways to train ANNs in Matlab 433
10.3 Artificial neural network-based design of the ductile precast concrete beams 436
10.3.1 Generation of the big structural data; a ductile design of the doubly reinforced precast concrete beams 436
10.3.2 Supervised training 439
10.3.3 Test networks and the design results 441
10.3.4 Conclusions 478
References 478
Index 479

It is US$10. To get this book send email: textileebooks@gmail.com

Share This

Related Posts

Previous
Next Post »