Sarees of India PDF by Dr. N. N. Mahapatra (Woodhead Publishing India)

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Sarees of India
By Dr. N. N. Mahapatra
Sarees of India

Contents
Preface xiii
1. Introduction: History of Saree 1
1.1 Interesting information on the background of sari 2
1.2 Type of sarees in India 5
1.3 Story, origin and history of saree 6
1.4 Styles of draping 7

2. Baluchari Sarees 9
2.1 Origin and history 12
2.2 The making 12
2.3 Story behind the design 12
2.4 Wearing Baluchari 13
2.5 Origin of Baluchari saree 13
2.6 Designs and themes 14
2.7 Process of making the Baluchari 17 

3. Banarasi Sarees 20
3.1 Geographical indication 23
3.2 Varieties 23
3.3 Environmental concern 26
3.4 Benares Brocade 26
3.5 Banarasi saris 27
3.6 Activity of Banaras cluster 28 

4. Bandhani Sarees 29
4.1 What is Bandhani? 32
4.2 The making of a Bandhani saree 33
4.3 Colours used and care 34
4.4 Major centres of tie and dye in India 34
4.5 The grace of Bandhani 35
4.6 How are Bandhani sarees made? 36

5. Chanderi Sarees 38
5.1 Charming Chanderi 38
5.2 Themes and motifs 41
5.3 Chanderi sarees 42 

6. Chiffon Sarees 44
6.1 Introduction 44
6.2 History 44
6.3 The making 45
6.4 Variety 45
6.5 The Bollywood factor 46
6.6 Maintenance 46
6.7 Weave 46
6.8 Twist 46
6.9 Transparency 47
6.10 Fraying 47
6.11 Cutting 47
6.12 Chiffon 47
6.13 Chiffon silk 47

7. Chikankari Sarees 51
7.1 The appeal of the Lucknawi sarees 51
7.2 Technique 54
7.3 GI status 55
7.4 Why Lucknow Chikan work? 56
7.5 Lucknawi sarees 56 

8. Gadwal Sarees 57
8.1 Origin and history 61
8.2 Attire and style 61
8.3 Sources of inspiration 61
8.4 Influence over the years 61
8.5 Innovations 62
8.6 Global influence 62
8.7 Wearing Gadwal saree 62
8.8 Interesting facts and comparisons 62 

9. Georgette Sarees 63
9.1 Georgette 64
9.2 Origin and history 67
9.3 Sources of inspiration 67
9.4 The making 67
9.5 Varieties 67
9.6 Style and attire 67
9.7 Innovations 68
9.8 Maintenance 68
9.9 Interesting facts and comparisons 68
9.10 Georgette silk 69
10. Jamdani Sarees 70
10.1 Introduction 70
10.2 Special appeal of the Jamdani cotton sarees 71
10.3 Etymology 72
10.4 History 72
10.5 Weave 72
10.6 Varieties of Jamdani work 73
10.7 Changes with time 74
10.8 Decline and fall 74
10.9 Origin and history 75
10.10 Sources of inspiration 75
10.11 The making 76
10.12 Varieties 77
10.13 Innovations 77
10.14 Occasion dressing 77
10.15 Maintenance 77
10.16 Interesting facts and comparisons 77
10.17 Jamdani in process 78
10.18 Various Jamdani 80
11. Kanchipuram Sarees 86
11.1 Introduction 86
11.2 Kanchipuram/Kanjivaram 87
11.3 Major weaving communities – The Devangas and 90
the Saligars
11.4 Silk sarees have become an integral part of occasions 90
11.5 Specialty 91
11.6 Silk thread for the saree 91
11.7 Weaving techniques of the Kanchipuram saree 91
11.8 Border on both the sides of the saree 92
11.9 Kanchipuram sarees are exported to different countries 92
11.10 Research by the experts regarding export 92
11.11 Bridal sutra – Kanchivaram silk sarees 93
12. Kantha Sarees 94
12.1 Introduction 94
13. Kosa Sarees 96
13.1 Introduction 96
13.2 Origin and history 97
13.3 The making 98
13.4 Present-day scenario 98
13.5 Faces behind the fabric 98
13.6 Modern uses 99
13.7 Authenticity of fabric 99
13.8 Occasion dressing 99
13.9 Suitability 99
13.10 Care tips for Kosa 99
13.11 Global appeal 100
13.12 Interesting facts and comparisons 100
14. Kota Saris 101
14.1 Introduction 101
14.2 Origin 101
14.3 History 102
14.4 Sources of inspiration 104
14.5 Varieties 104
14.6 Weave 105
14.7 Industry 105
14.8 Present-day scenario 105
14.9 How ‘Kota sarees’ are made? 106
14.10 Production process 107
14.11 Global appeal 113
14.12 Maintenance 113
14.13 Interesting facts 113
15. Nauvari Sarees 114
15.1 Introduction 114
15.2 Types of draping 114
15.3 Origin and history 116
15.4 Sources of inspiration 116
15.5 Different drapes of Nauvari 116
15.6 Wearing the attire 117
15.7 Evolution of Nauvari 117
15.8 Interesting facts and comparisons 117
15.9 Why do women rides a horse in Nauvari saree during 118
GudiPadwa festival in Maharashtra?
15.10 Usage 118
15.11 Designs 121
15.12 Inspiration 121
16. Paithani Sarees 123
16.1 Introduction 123
16.2 Speciality of Paithani sari 126
16.3 Technical details 126
16.4 Paithani from Paithan 127
16.5 Paithani sarees 127
16.6 Making of the Paithani 129
16.7 Classification of Paithani saree 130
16.8 Motifs 131
16.9 Colour dyeing 133
16.10 Manufacturing processes 134
16.11 Borders and the pallu 136
16.12 Types of Paithani 136
17. Patan Patola Sarees 138
17.1 Introduction 138
17.2 Patola sarees date back to history 146
17.3 Reigning of Patola sarees 146
17.4 Patola sarees – a symbol of status 146
17.5 What are Patola sarees? 146
17.6 Patola sarees – a treasure collection 147
17.7 Types of Patola sarees 148
17.8 High priced Patola sarees 148
17.9 Fabric in Patola saree 148
17.10 Making of Patola sarees 148
18. Pochampally Ikat Saris 151
19. Sambalpuri Sarees 154
19.1 Introduction 154
19.2 An intricate Ikkat weave of Sambalpuri saree 155
19.3 Textiles of Odisha (Orissa) 155
19.4 Ikat sarees 158
19.5 Bomkai sarees 159
19.6 Caligraphy textiles/phetas of Orissa 159
19.7 Koraput sarees 160
19.8 Pictorial sarees 160
20. Tant Saree 161
20.1 Introduction 161
20.2 History 162
20.3 Weaving method 162
20.4 Themes and motif 163
20.5 Care 163
20.6 Tant 163
20.7 The speciality of the Tant handlooms 165
20.8 Modern trends 166
20.9 The great influx 168
20.10 Traditional styles 168
20.11 Tangail 171
21. Venkatagiri Sarees 173
21.1 History and origin 173
21.2 Weave 174
21.3 Variety 174
21.4 Sources of inspiration 175
21.5 Faces behind Venkatagiri sarees 175
21.6 Present-day scenario 175
21.7 Innovations 176
21.8 Wearing Venkatagiri 176
Index 179

Preface
The saree is one of the world’s oldest attire of un- stitched garment, which is the most representative apparel of India that has intrigued men and women all over the world. It has thus become a sensuous, glamorous all-time-wear for women in India. The saree is a fabric-length of varying in its body, borders and end pieces which can be worn in a variety of ways, has been evolving with time.

“Sarees of India” is a profound overview of various kinds of this fascinating unstitched garment and how it differs from one another. With the research put in to learn about different types of sarees from different origin of India, thus emerges the first comprehensive compilation of the whole range and scale of the sarees the structures, designs, colours, the format and technology that make up the the saree; the inspiration, living experience and sensibilities of the weaving that defines the Saree and make it one of a kind.

It has been quite a journey, the unwinding of the story of the types of saree, For many years we had imagined that the saree was of one kind as worn in urban India, until recently. Like everything else, the wearing style of the sari had changed and is now changing more rapidly than we can imagine. The un-stitched cloth is a truly Indian phenomenon. It gives to us a visual identity and the sari in particular, is celebrated everywhere as Indian. And so, this volume brings together sari types, the how and where of their making, and their wearing styles. There may be more out there, but they are certainly no less than those presented in here.

I remember my mom(Kumudini) had been to the US in 1960’s along with my dad (Prof Dr Gokulananda Mahapatra) and me and my elder sister Dr Jyotshna Mahapatra. That time very few Indians used to go to US especially from my native place Orissa (now Odisha). She used to tell that time the Americans were very surprised to see my mom wearing a saree. My moms best friend Mrs Grace Luder (American) was very eager to know how to wear a saree. She used to buy 5-6 mtrs cloth in American Store and wear as a saree. We stayed there for two and half years in Boston. She was very fond of different types of sarees.

Later my wife Seemani Parija (granddaughter of legendry freedom fighter of Bengal Mr Patriram Parija ) was born and brought up in Calcutta (now Kolkata) is also very fond of different types of sarees. She wants each and every saree in her wardrobe. Her expertise in wearing saree is being followed by all non–saree states in India.

I am thankful to my two daughters Nittisha (Software developer) and Sanchitta (Designer from NIFT) for helping me to compile this book. I want to dedicate this book to my Late mother Mrs Kumudini Mahapatra.

It is US$10. To get this book send email: textileebooks@gmail.com

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