The Story of Industrial Engineering: The Rise from Shop-Floor Management to Modern Digital Engineering PDF by Adedeji B. Badiru

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The Story of Industrial Engineering: The Rise from Shop-Floor Management to Modern Digital Engineering
By Adedeji B. Badiru
The Story of Industrial Engineering: The Rise from Shop-Floor Management to Modern Digital Engineering

Contents
Preface, xiii
Acknowledgments, xv
Author, xvii
Chapter 1 ◾ Personal Background for Industrial Engineering 1
EXERCISING IE THINKING 6
Chapter 2 ◾ The Journey into Industrial Engineering 7
Chapter 3 ◾ Why Industrial Engineering? 11
REFERENCES 31
Chapter 4 ◾ Industrial Engineering Education 33
THE LINK TO SYSTEMS THINKING 37
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING EDUCATION AT TENNESSEE TECH 37
RELEVANCE TO NATIONAL ACADEMY OF ENGINEERING’S 14 GRAND CHALLENGES 38
Chapter 5 ◾ The Early Pioneers of Industrial Engineering 41
RALPH MOSSER BARNES 41
MARVIN EVERETT MUNDEL 43
WILLIAM A. GOLOMSKI 45
FREDERICK WINSLOW TAYLOR 46
HENRY LAURENCE GANTT 48
FRANK BUNKER AND LILLIAN GILBRETH 48
Chapter 6 ◾ Process Improvement in Industrial Engineering 53
BUSINESS PROCESS REENGINEERING 56
LEAN 57
SIX SIGMA 58
SELECTING A METHODOLOGY 59
REFERENCES 60
Chapter 7 ◾ Performance Measurement in Industrial Engineering 61
MEASUREMENT IN THE CONTEXT OF PLANNING 64
THE MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION PROCESS 65
PURPOSES OF STRATEGIC PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT 68
Control 69
Improvement 71
Planning 72
Diagnosis 74
Promotion 75
DIMENSIONS OF PERFORMANCE 76
_e Concept of Key Performance Areas 76
_e Balanced Scorecard 77
_e Baldrige Criteria 80
Sink’s Seven Criteria 82
Productivity 83
Quality 84
Human Capital 86
IMPLEMENTING A MEASUREMENT SYSTEM 89
Input/Output Analysis Using the SIPOC Model 90
A Macro Strategic Measurement Methodology 92
PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT PITFALLS 97
Integrity Audits 99
ORGANIZATIONAL ASSESSMENTS: STRATEGIC SNAPSHOTS OF PERFORMANCE 101
REFERENCES 103
Chapter 8 ◾ Industrial Engineering and Lean Manufacturing 109
WASTE ELIMINATION 111
SYSTEMS VIEW OF LEAN 113
LEAN MANUFACTURING CELL 113
ORGANIZING A CELL 115
PROCEDURE 116
SIMULATION MODELING 117
CONCLUSION 118
REFERENCES 118
Chapter 9 ◾ Industrial Engineering and Human Factors 121
ELEMENTS OF HUMAN FACTORS 123
Cognition 123
Behavior 123
Performance 124
Reliability 125
THE BENEFITS OF HUMAN FACTORS 125
A HUMAN FACTORS CONCEPTUAL MODEL 126
Long-Term Memory 126
Types of Long-Term Memory 127
Implications for Design 129
Case: Power-Plant Control 129
Working Memory 130
Implications for Design 132
Case: Cockpit Checklists 133
Sensation 133
Implications for Design 135
Case: Industrial Dashboards 135
Perception 136
Implications for Design 136
Case: In-Vehicle Navigation Systems 137
Attention and Mental Workload 138
Implications for Design 139
Case: Warnings 140
Situation Awareness 140
Implications for Design 142
Case: Air-Traffic Systems 142
Decision-Making 143
Diagnosis 143
Choice 144
Decision-Making Heuristics 146
Implications for Design 147
Case: Accident Investigation 148
COGNITIVE CONSEQUENCES OF DESIGN 149
Learning 149
Implications for Design 150
Error 150
Implications for Design 151
SUMMARY 152
REFERENCES 153
Chapter 10 ◾ Industrial Engineering and Digital Engineering 159
EARLY DAYS 162
SHIFT TO PRODUCTION PARTS 162
EXTENSION TO FUNCTIONAL APPLICATIONS 163
ADDITIVE CHALLENGES AND FUTURE POTENTIAL 164
SUMMARY 165
CONCLUSION OF THE STORY 166
REFERENCE 166
Chapter 11 ◾ Industrial Engineering Around and About 167
INTRODUCTION 167
CONCLUSION 174
REFERENCES 174

Preface
This focus test uses a storytelling approach to present the rich history of industrial engineering and its multitude of applications. _is text traces the profession from its early days to the present day of digital engineering and additive manufacturing. _e potpourri of stories includes the emergence of union movements, early human factors, early practices of ergonomics, the days of e_ciency experts, the legend of cheaper by the dozen, the movement of scienti_c management, the evolution of manufacturing, the applications of management engineering, early management principles and movement, the emergence of formal industrial engineering, the diversi_cation of industrial engineering, the risk of the fragmentation of industrial engineering, the o_shoot professions and specializations, the struggle to keep the core (center) of industrial engineering, the mitigation of the splinter areas of the profession, the shadow functions of industrial engineering, the sustaining of the profession under a common core, the move into additive manufacturing applications, the concept of general digital engineering, and so on. _e text takes a relaxed and interesting storytelling tone to engage the interest of readers. _e anecdotes recounted are based both on published literature as well as the author’s own direct education, experience, and practice of the profession. _is is not a textbook. Rather, it is a book of stories used to highlight the versatility and applicability of industrial engineering.

Personal Background for Industrial Engineering
Industrial engineering in today is different from the industrial engineering of the past. _e job shops of the past are now the digital shops of today. _is speaks to the diversity and exibility of the profession. _e main premise of writing this focus book is to recognize, celebrate, and promote the diversity and versatility of the unadulterated profession of industrial engineering. It is written from my own personal observation, education, experience, and direct practice. It is sort of an eyewitness account of the glory of industrial engineering. I envision that the storytelling approach of this focus book will inspire the study, practice, and spread of industrial engineering.

In order to understand my fervent advocacy for industrial engineering, you will need to understand the story of how and why I was attracted to the profession in the _rst place, many decades ago. It is a very interesting background story. My _rst exposure to an industrial environment started in December 1972 in Lagos, Nigeria. Upon completion of my secondary school education at the famed Saint Finbarr’s College, Akoka, Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria, I was employed as a factory supervisor at Associated Industries Limited (AIL) at Apapa, a mainland suburb of Lagos. _e company made mints (peppermint). I got the employment barely two weeks a_er graduation from the secondary school. So, I did not have much time to decompress from the rigidly controlled educational regimen of Saint Finbarr’s College, which was run as a tight ship by the principal, Reverend Father Denis Slattery, an Irish Priest. Father Slattery was popular throughout Nigeria at that time for his uncompromising commitment to seeing the school excel in academics, discipline, and sports. Fortunately, these three requirements _t my own personal attributes. So, I was a star scholar at the school. _e discipline received under Father Slattery is still manifested today in my commitment to self-discipline. My Finbarr’s-sparked interest in sports, focused primarily on soccer, has continued to this day. My focus on academics at the school later transferred into the pursuit of advanced degrees. _e fact that I easily and quickly secured employment at Associated Industries soon a_er leaving high school was due to the fact that I graduated from Saint Finbarr’s College with a Grade I Distinction in the West African Examination Council (WAEC) general external examination, which was required for graduation from high school in Nigeria at that time.

It was at AIL that I had my _rst taste of what would later become my profession of industrial engineering. At that time, I was not even aware of what industrial engineering was. What I knew was that some sort of better management was needed for AIL’s production operations. I was assigned to the sugar-milling department. My job was to supervise casual labor employees in the process of pouring 100-pound bags of sugar into a large drum for the milling operation, which was one of the _rst stages of the peppermint production process. _e factory engineer was an expatriate, who would always get furiously mad at me whenever the laborers mistakenly poured wet sugar into the machine, thereby causing a clog in the machine, which then necessitated production line shutdown. All of my workers were illiterate casual laborers, who did not know what was going on except that they were required to heave 100-pound bags of sugar over their heads to pour into the giant rotating drum, very much like a cement mixer. _e workers could not peek into the drum to see what was going on inside of it.

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