The Critical Success Factors of Green Supply Chain Management in Emerging Economies PDF by Syed Abdul Rehman Khan

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The Critical Success Factors of Green Supply Chain Management in Emerging Economies
By Syed Abdul Rehman Khan
The Critical Success Factors of Green Supply Chain Management in Emerging Economies

Contents

1 Introduction to the Green Supply Chain Management  1
1.1 Background  1
1.1.1 Public Awareness About the Environmental Impact  2
1.1.2 Tough Firm Competition  3
1.1.3 Government Strict Laws for Green Performance  3
1.1.4 Recycling and Remanufacturing Products to Save Money  5
1.2 International Laws  5
1.2.1 European Union Countries  6
1.2.2 Asian Countries  6
1.3 Highlights of Environmental Laws in Pakistan  7
1.4 Definition of GSCM in the Context of Pakistan  9
1.5 The Network of Reverse Logistics  10
1.6 Differences Between Forwarding and Reverse Logistics  12
1.7 Pakistani Manufacturing Sector  16
1.8 Manufacturing Industry Growth  16
1.8.1 Major Industries’ Growth in Manufacturing Sector  18
1.8.2 Large-Scale Manufacturing Industry: Products Growth  18
1.9 Production Index of Manufacturing Sector  18
1.10 Leading Textile Industry in Pakistan 20
1.11 Automotive Industry  21
1.12 Other Major Products  23
1.13 Problem Statement  26
1.14 Research Objectives  28
1.15 Research Scope  28
1.16 Research Method  28
1.17 Thesis Structure  29
References  32
2 Empirical Studies on Green Supply Chain Management  35
2.1 Introduction 35
2.2 Development in GSCM  35
2.3 Development of Hypothesis  36
2.3.1 Internal Environmental Management and Green
Information Systems  36
2.3.2 Internal Environmental Management and Green
Manufacturing  37
2.3.3 Internal Environmental Management and Green
Distribution 39
2.3.4 Internal Environmental Management and Green
Transportation  40
2.3.5 Internal Environmental Management and Ecological
Design  41
2.3.6 Green Information System and Green Manufacturing  42
2.3.7 Green Information System and Green Distribution  43
2.3.8 Green Information System and Green Transportation  44
2.3.9 Green Information System and Ecological Design  45
2.3.10 Green Manufacturing System and Economic
Performance 47
2.3.11 Green Manufacturing System and Competitive Edge  48
2.3.12 Green Manufacturing System and Environmental
Performance  49
2.3.13 Green Distribution and Competitive Advantage  50
2.3.14 Green Distribution and Environmental Performance  51
2.3.15 Green Transportation and Competitive Advantage  52
2.3.16 Green Transportation and Environmental Performance  52
2.3.17 Ecological Design and Economic Performance  53
2.3.18 Ecological Design and Competitive Advantage  54
2.3.19 Ecological Design and Environmental Performance  55
2.3.20 Environmental Performance and Economic Performance  55
2.3.21 Environmental Performance and Organizational
Performance  56
2.3.22 Competitive Advantage and Organizational Performance  57
2.3.23 Economic Performance and Organizational Performance  58
References  58
3 Theoretical Framework and Methodology of GSCM  65
3.1 Summary of Research Objectives  65
3.1.1 Theoretical Framework to Support Research Objective  66
3.2 Research Design  73
3.2.1 Research Approaches  74
3.2.2 Research Methods  75
3.2.3 Research Context  76
3.2.4 Research Process  76
3.3 Discussion of Current Research Methods  76
3.3.1 Questionnaire Survey  77
3.3.2 Unstructured Interviews  77
3.4 Choice of Research Locations and Interviewees  77
3.5 Statistical Techniques  77
3.6 Sampling Techniques  78
3.7 Data Source  79
3.7.1 Questionnaire Analysis  79
3.7.2 Primary Data  79
3.7.3 Secondary Data  79
3.8 Research Plan  80
3.9 Research Model 80
3.10 Research Hypotheses  80
3.11 Overview of Research Methodology  83
References  84
4 Statistical Analyses of Green Supply Chain Management  89
4.1 Survey Response Analysis  89
4.1.1 Survey Response Analysis 89
4.1.2 Non-response and Response Bias  92
4.2 Data Screening and Initial Analysis  93
4.2.1 Missing Data and Outliers  94
4.2.2 Normality of Data  94
4.2.3 Common Method Bias  94
4.2.4 PLS-SEM  95
4.3 Measurement Refinement and Initial Analysis  96
4.3.1 Reliability and Validity of Measures  96
4.3.2 Confirmatory Factor Analysis  102
4.4 Model Validation  109
4.4.1 Convergent Validity 109
4.4.2 Discriminant Validity  109
4.4.3 Quality Criteria of Model  113
4.5 Structural Model Evaluation  114
4.5.1 Structural Model Evaluation  114
4.5.2 Model Fit  118
4.5.3 Path Effects  120
4.5.4 Hypothesis Testing  131
4.6 Interview Analysis  132
4.6.1 Barriers of GSCM  132
4.6.2 Drivers of GSCM  146
References  164
5 Discussion on Green Supply Chain Management  167
5.1 Quantitative Part of the Research  167
5.1.1 IEM and GIS  167
5.1.2 IEM and GM  169
5.1.3 IEM and GD  173
5.1.4 IEM and GT 176
5.1.5 IEM and ED  178
5.1.6 GIS and GM  180
5.1.7 GIS and GD  182
5.1.8 GIS and GT  185
5.1.9 GIS and ED  188
5.1.10 GM and ECP  190
5.1.11 GM and CA 193
5.1.12 GM and ENP  195
5.1.13 GD and CA  197
5.1.14 GD and ENP  199
5.1.15 GT and CA  200
5.1.16 GT and ENP  202
5.1.17 ED and ECP  203
5.1.18 ED and CA  205
5.1.19 ED and ENP  206
5.1.20 ENP and ECP  207
5.1.21 ENP and ORP  208
5.1.22 CA and ORP  210
5.1.23 ECP and ORP 211
5.2 Qualitative Part of the Research  213
5.2.1 GSCM Barriers in Manufacturing Firms of Pakistan  213
5.2.2 GSCM Drivers in Manufacturing Firms of Pakistan  227
References  235
6 Practical Implications and Recommendations for Green
Supply Chain Management  241
6.1 Key Findings from Mixed Approached  241
6.2 Practical Implications  241
6.2.1 The Key Barriers  242
6.2.2 The Key Drivers  243
6.3 Research Contribution  246
6.3.1 Achievements of Research Objectives  248
6.3.2 Contribution to Knowledge (the Model)  248
6.3.3 Find Out Reasons Why Practitioners Adopt
or Not Adopt Green Practices  248
6.3.4 Implications for Practitioners  249
6.3.5 Implications to Government  249
6.4 Research Recommendations, Limitations, and Future Research  249
Appendix A: Correlational Matrix  251
Appendix B: Questionnaire  255
Appendix C: Interview Questions  257
Index 259

Preface
Society has started to realize that living unsustainably is not an option for the human race. The Anthropocene is upon us, where man’s actions can cause irreversible changes to our air, land, and water environment. We can alter the climate of the entire Earth with our actions. We are capable of causing entire species to extinction, never to be seen on Earth again.

These anthropocentric effects are due to our social and economic behaviors. We are currently, as a world, consuming more than one Earth can handle. If the global consumption rate were the same as some of our most developed regions, it would require up to a dozen Earth’s worth of resources.

The detriments to the environment and natural resources caused by our activities can be traced to businesses and industries. They have the greatest environmental impact, all in order to serve our needs. It is the processes and materials they use, how they design our products and services, and how products are stewarded by these companies.

It is only recently, that greening our businesses and their supply chains has come to the forefront. The topic includes thousands of studies and publications from across disciplines considering how to make our industry and economies greener.

There is no doubt that manufacturing has been one of the critical areas that support and influence a nation’s economy since the eighteenth century. As the primary driving force behind economic growth, manufacturing serves as the foundation of and contributes to other industries. In the past, manufacturing has contributed significantly to modern civilization and created the momentum that drives today’s economy. However, due to the substantial manufacturing activities, particularly in emerging economies, environmental sustainability is on risk, which created a challenge for governmental bodies and policymakers to prevent harmful activities before it is too late.

As a general overview, Chap. 1 begins with a clear definition of green supply chain management and their needs in today’s businesses, specifically in emerging countries. Cchapter 2 is based on in-depth literature reviews and hypotheses development.

Chapter 3 covers the theoretical framework and methodology adopted to examine the critical success factors and barriers faced by firms. Chapter 4 includes different statistical modeling, statistical techniques, and results of the study. Chapter 5 contains a detailed discussion on the study results and comparison with previously published literature. Finally, Chap. 6 covers concluding remarks and policy implications to the managerial staff and governmental bodies for the sake of better environmental sustainability.
 
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