Fundamentals of Logic Design, Enhanced 7th Edition PDF by Charles H Roth, Jr., Larry L Kinney, and Eugene B John

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Fundamentals of Logic Design, Enhanced Seventh Edition

By Charles H. Roth, Jr., Larry L. Kinney, and Eugene B. John

Fundamentals of Logic Design, Enhanced 7th Edition PDF by Charles H Roth, Jr., Larry L Kinney, and Eugene B John

Contents:

Preface xiii

How to Use This Book for Self-Study xviii

Digital Resources xix

About the Authors xxiv

Unit 1 Introduction

Number Systems and Conversion 1

Objectives 1

Study Guide 2

1.1 Digital Systems and Switching Circuits 6

1.2 Number Systems and Conversion 8

1.3 Binary Arithmetic 12

1.4 Representation of Negative Numbers 16

Sign and Magnitude Numbers 16

2’s Complement Numbers 16

Addition of 2’s Complement Numbers 17

1’s Complement Numbers 19

Addition of 1’s Complement Numbers 19

1.5 Binary Codes 21

Problems 24

Unit 2 Boolean Algebra 29

Objectives 29

Study Guide 30

2.1 Introduction 36

2.2 Basic Operations 37

2.3 Boolean Expressions and Truth Tables 39

2.4 Basic Theorems 41

2.5 Commutative, Associative, Distributive, and

DeMorgan’s Laws 43

2.6 Simplification Theorems 46

2.7 Multiplying Out and Factoring 49

2.8 Complementing Boolean Expressions 52

Problems 53

Unit 3 Boolean Algebra (Continued) 60

Objectives 60

Study Guide 61

3.1 Multiplying Out and Factoring Expressions 66

3.2 Exclusive-OR and Equivalence Operations 68

3.3 The Consensus Theorem 70

3.4 Algebraic Simplification of Switching Expressions 72

3.5 Proving Validity of an Equation 74

Programmed Exercises 77

Problems 82

Unit 4 Applications of Boolean Algebra

Minterm and Maxterm Expansions 87

Objectives 87

Study Guide 88

4.1 Conversion of English Sentences to Boolean Equations 94

4.2 Combinational Logic Design Using a Truth Table 96

4.3 Minterm and Maxterm Expansions 97

4.4 General Minterm and Maxterm Expansions 100

4.5 Incompletely Specified Functions 103

4.6 Examples of Truth Table Construction 104

4.7 Design of Binary Adders and Subtracters 108

Problems 114

Unit 5 Karnaugh Maps 123

Objectives 123

Study Guide 124

5.1 Minimum Forms of Switching Functions 134

5.2 Two- and Three-Variable Karnaugh Maps 136

5.3 Four-Variable Karnaugh Maps 141

5.4 Determination of Minimum Expressions Using

Essential Prime Implicants 144

5.5 Five-Variable Karnaugh Maps 149

5.6 Other Uses of Karnaugh Maps 152

5.7 Other Forms of Karnaugh Maps 153

Programmed Exercises 154

Problems 159

Unit 6 Quine-McCluskey Method 167

Objectives 167

Study Guide 168

6.1 Determination of Prime Implicants 173

6.2 The Prime Implicant Chart 176

6.3 Petrick’s Method 179

6.4 Simplification of Incompletely Specified Functions 181

6.5 Simplification Using Map-Entered Variables 182

6.6 Conclusion 184

Programmed Exercise 185

Problems 189

Unit 7 Multi-Level Gate Circuits

NAND and NOR Gates 193

Objectives 193

Study Guide 194

7.1 Multi-Level Gate Circuits 199

7.2 NAND and NOR Gates 204

7.3 Design of Two-Level NAND- and NOR-Gate Circuits 206

7.4 Design of Multi-Level NAND- and NOR-Gate Circuits 209

7.5 Circuit Conversion Using Alternative Gate Symbols 210

7.6 Design of Two-Level, Multiple-Output Circuits 214

Determination of Essential Prime Implicants for

Multiple-Output Realization 216

7.7 Multiple-Output NAND- and NOR-Gate Circuits 217

Problems 218

Unit 8 Combinational Circuit Design

and Simulation Using Gates 225

Objectives 225

Study Guide 226

8.1 Review of Combinational Circuit Design 229

8.2 Design of Circuits with Limited Gate Fan-In 230

8.3 Gate Delays and Timing Diagrams 232

8.4 Hazards in Combinational Logic 234

8.5 Simulation and Testing of Logic Circuits 240

Problems 243

Design Problems 246

Seven-Segment Indicator 246

Unit 9 Multiplexers, Decoders, and Programmable

Logic Devices 252

Objectives 252

Study Guide 253

9.1 Introduction 260

9.2 Multiplexers 261

9.3 Three-State Buffers 265

9.4 Decoders and Encoders 268

9.5 Read-Only Memories 271

9.6 Programmable Logic Devices 275

Programmable Logic Arrays 275

Programmable Array Logic 278

9.7 Complex Programmable Logic Devices 280

9.8 Field-Programmable Gate Arrays 282

Decomposition of Switching Functions 283

Problems 286

Unit 10 Introduction to VHDL 294

Objectives 294

Study Guide 295

10.1 VHDL Description of Combinational Circuits 299

10.2 VHDL Models for Multiplexers 304

10.3 VHDL Modules 306

Four-Bit Full Adder 308

10.4 Signals and Constants 311

10.5 Arrays 312

10.6 VHDL Operators 315

10.7 Packages and Libraries 316

10.8 IEEE Standard Logic 318

10.9 Compilation and Simulation of VHDL Code 321

Problems 322

Design Problems 327

Unit 11 Latches and Flip-Flops 331

Objectives 331

Study Guide 332

11.1 Introduction 336

11.2 Set-Reset Latch 338

11.3 Gated Latches 342

11.4 Edge-Triggered D Flip-Flop 346

11.5 S-R Flip-Flop 349

11.6 J-K Flip-Flop 350

11.7 T Flip-Flop 351

11.8 Flip-Flops with Additional Inputs 352

11.9 Asynchronous Sequential Circuits 354

11.10 Summary 357

Problems 358

Programmed Exercise 367

Unit 12 Registers and Counters 370

Objectives 370

Study Guide 371

12.1 Registers and Register Transfers 376

Parallel Adder with Accumulator 378

12.2 Shift Registers 380

12.3 Design of Binary Counters 384

12.4 Counters for Other Sequences 389

Counter Design Using D Flip-Flops 393

12.5 Counter Design Using S-R and J-K Flip-Flops 395

12.6 Derivation of Flip-Flop Input Equations—Summary 398

Problems 402

Unit 13 Analysis of Clocked Sequential Circuits 412

Objectives 412

Study Guide 413

13.1 A Sequential Parity Checker 419

13.2 Analysis by Signal Tracing and Timing Charts 421

13.3 State Tables and Graphs 425

Construction and Interpretation of Timing Charts 430

13.4 General Models for Sequential Circuits 432

Programmed Exercise 436

Problems 441

Unit 14 Derivation of State Graphs and Tables 453

Objectives 453

Study Guide 454

14.1 Design of a Sequence Detector 457

14.2 More Complex Design Problems 463

14.3 Guidelines for Construction of State Graphs 467

14.4 Serial Data Code Conversion 473

14.5 Alphanumeric State Graph Notation 476

14.6 Incompletely Specified State Tables 478

Programmed Exercises 480

Problems 486

Unit 15 Reduction of State Tables

State Assignment 497

Objectives 497

Study Guide 498

15.1 Elimination of Redundant States 505

15.2 Equivalent States 507

15.3 Determination of State Equivalence Using an

Implication Table 509

15.4 Equivalent Sequential Circuits 512

15.5 Reducing Incompletely Specified State Tables 514

15.6 Derivation of Flip-Flop Input Equations 517

15.7 Equivalent State Assignments 519

15.8 Guidelines for State Assignment 523

15.9 Using a One-Hot State Assignment 528

Problems 531

Unit 16 Sequential Circuit Design 545

Objectives 545

Study Guide 546

16.1 Summary of Design Procedure for Sequential Circuits 548

16.2 Design Example—Code Converter 549

16.3 Design of Iterative Circuits 553

Design of a Comparator 553

16.4 Design of Sequential Circuits Using ROMs and PLAs 556

16.5 Sequential Circuit Design Using CPLDs 559

16.6 Sequential Circuit Design Using FPGAs 563

16.7 Simulation and Testing of Sequential Circuits 565

16.8 Overview of Computer-Aided Design 570

Design Problems 572

Additional Problems 578

Unit 17 VHDL for Sequential Logic 585

Objectives 585

Study Guide 586

17.1 Modeling Flip-Flops Using VHDL Processes 590

17.2 Modeling Registers and Counters

Using VHDL Processes 594

17.3 Modeling Combinational Logic Using VHDL Processes 599

17.4 Modeling a Sequential Machine 601

17.5 Synthesis of VHDL Code 608

17.6 More About Processes and Sequential Statements 611

Problems 613

Simulation Problems 624

Unit 18 Circuits for Arithmetic Operations 626

Objectives 626

Study Guide 627

18.1 Serial Adder with Accumulator 629

18.2 Design of a Binary Multiplier 633

18.3 Design of a Binary Divider 637

Programmed Exercises 644

Problems 648

Unit 19 State Machine Design with SM Charts 660

Objectives 660

Study Guide 661

19.1 State Machine Charts 662

19.2 Derivation of SM Charts 667

19.3 Realization of SM Charts 672

Problems 677

Unit 20 VHDL for Digital System Design 684

Objectives 684

Study Guide 685

20.1 VHDL Code for a Serial Adder 688

20.2 VHDL Code for a Binary Multiplier 690

20.3 VHDL Code for a Binary Divider 700

20.4 VHDL Code for a Dice Game Simulator 702

20.5 Concluding Remarks 705

Problems 706

Lab Design Problems 709

A Appendices 713

A MOS and CMOS Logic 713

B VHDL Language Summary 719

C Tips for Writing Synthesizable VHDL Code 724

D Proofs of Theorems 727

E Answers to Selected Study Guide Questions and Problems 729

References 785

Index 786

Description of the CD 792

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