Successful Construction Supply Chain Management: Concepts and Case Studies, Second Edition PDF by Stephen Pryke

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Successful Construction Supply Chain Management: Concepts and Case Studies, Second Edition
Edited by Stephen Pryke
Successful Construction Supply Chain Management: Concepts and Case Studies, Second Edition

Contents

List of Contributors xv
Preface xxi
Acknowledgements xxiii
1 Introduction 1
Stephen Pryke
1.1 Overview: Part A 2
1.1.1 IT, Digital, and BIM 2
1.1.2 Self-Organising Networks in Supply Chains 2
1.1.3 Green Issues 3
1.1.4 Demand Chains and Supply Chains 4
1.1.5 Lean 5
1.1.6 Power Structures and Systemic Risk 5
1.1.7 Decision-Making Maturity 6
1.2 Overview: Part B 7
1.2.1 Lessons from Megaprojects 7
1.2.2 Collaboration and Integration 8
1.2.3 Lesson Learned and Findings from Tier 1 Contractors 8
1.2.4 Lean Practices in The Netherlands 9
1.2.5 Knowledge Transfer in Supply Chains 10
1.2.6 The Role of Trust in Managing Supply Chains 10
1.3 Summary 11
References 11
Part I Chapters that Principally, but not Exclusively, Deal with
Concepts and the Development of Theory 13
2 The Digital Supply Chain: Mobilising Supply Chain Management
Philosophy to Reconceptualise Digital Technologies and Building
Information Modelling (BIM) 15
Eleni Papadonikolaki
2.1 Introduction 15
2.2 The Nature of Construction 17
2.2.1 Addressing Existing Complexity and Fragmentation in Construction 17
2.2.2 Advancements from Other Industries Applicable to Construction 17
2.2.3 Potential Synergies Between Supply Chain Management and
Digitisation 19
2.3 Origins and Development of Supply Chain Thinking in AEC 20
2.3.1 The Emergence of Supply Chain Thinking from Operations and Logistics
Research 20
2.3.2 The Adaptation of Supply Chain Management Concepts in AEC 21
2.4 Pragmatic Impact of Supply Chain Thinking in Construction 22
2.4.1 Supply Chain Thinking Schools 22
2.4.2 Supply Chain Concepts and Varying Interpretations 23
2.5 Origins and Development of Digitisation in the Built Environment 23
2.5.1 Development of Digital Capabilities in the Built Environment 23
2.5.2 From Building ProductModels to Building InformationModelling (BIM) 25
2.5.3 Importance of Standards in a Digital Built Environment 25
2.5.4 Pluralism of Digital Artefacts and BIM Maturity Assessment Methods 26
2.6 Pragmatic Impact of Digitisation and BIM 28
2.6.1 BIM and the Enterprise: Bottom-Up Adoption 28
2.6.2 BIM and the Institutional Setting: Top-Down Diffusion 28
2.6.3 Mismatch Between Top-Down and Bottom-Up Strategies 29
2.7 Synthesis of Digital Technologies Construction Supply Chain 30
2.7.1 Potential and Outlook of Digital Technologies to Support Supply Chains 30
2.7.2 Co-Evolution of Supply Chain Management and Digital in AEC 31
2.8 Conclusion 32
References 34
3 At the Interface:When Social Network Analysis and Supply Chain
ManagementMeet 43
Huda Almadhoob
3.1 Introduction 43
3.2 Reconceptualising Supply Chains 44
3.3 Supply Networks as Complex Adaptive Systems 45
3.4 What Is Social Network Analysis? 50
3.5 Rationale for a Network Approach 52
3.6 Key Challenges in Conducting Social Network Analysis 54
3.7 Conclusions and Directions for Future Research 55
3.8 Managerial Implications 56
References 57
4 Green Supply Chain Management in Construction: A Systematic
Review 63
NiamhMurtagh and Sulafa Badi
4.1 Introduction 63
4.1.1 Environmental Impact of Construction 64
4.1.2 Definition 65
4.2 Research Methodology 66
4.2.1 Stage 1: Define Eligibility Criteria 66
4.2.2 Stage 2: Define Search Terms 67
4.2.3 Stage 3: Search, Screen, and Compile List of Included Papers 67
4.2.4 Stage 4: Code and Critically Evaluate Included Studies 67
4.2.5 Stage 5: Formulate Synthesis 68
4.3 Analysis 68
4.3.1 Research Interest over Time 68
4.3.2 Source Journals 68
4.3.3 Geographic Spread 69
4.3.4 Methods 69
4.3.5 Tools and Techniques 72
4.3.6 Stakeholders 73
4.3.7 Definitions of Green Supply Chain Management 74
4.4 Discussion 75
4.4.1 Overview 75
4.4.2 Definition 75
4.4.3 Nature of Construction 76
4.4.4 Stakeholder Roles 77
4.4.5 Practical Recommendations 77
4.5 Looking to the Future 78
4.6 Conclusion 80
References 81
5 Connecting the ‘Demand Chain’ with the ‘Supply Chain’: (Re)creating
Organisational Routines in Life Cycle Transitions 87
Simon Addyman
5.1 Introduction 87
5.1.1 The Temporal Paradox in Temporary Organising 89
5.2 The Construction Industry – Procurement and Relational Difficulties 90
5.3 Temporary Organisations and the Project Life Cycle 92
5.4 Routines and the Capability of Projects 95
5.5 A Recursive Process Model of Transitioning 98
5.6 Discussion 101
5.7 Summary 103
References 104
6 Construction Supply Chain Management through a Lean Lens 109
Lauri Koskela, Ruben Vrijhoef and Rafaella Dana Broft
6.1 Introduction 109
6.2 Theoretical and Philosophical Grounding of Lean 110
6.2.1 Theoretical and Philosophical Grounding of the Mainstream Approach to
Production Management 110
6.2.2 Theoretical and Philosophical Grounding of Lean 111
6.2.2.1 Theory of Production 111
6.2.2.2 Epistemology of the Lean Concept 112
6.2.2.3 Ontology of the Lean Concept 112
6.2.3 Implications for Management and Organising 113
6.3 Theoretical Background and Characterisation of Supply Chain
Management 114
6.3.1 Production Perspective 114
6.3.2 Economic Perspective 115
6.3.3 Organisational Perspective 116
6.3.4 Social Perspective 116
6.4 Analysis of Supply Chain Approaches and Conceptualisations through a Lean
Versus Mainstream Lens 117
6.5 Contingency of Supply Chain Management in Construction through a Lean
Lens 118
6.5.1 Construction from a Production Perspective 119
6.5.2 Construction from an Economic Perspective 119
6.5.3 Construction from an Organisational Perspective 119
6.5.4 Construction from a Social Perspective 121
6.5.5 A Crossover of Supply Chain Management and Lean in the Context of
Construction 121
6.6 Discussion 121
6.7 Conclusion 122
References 122
7 Supply Chain Management and Risk Set in Changing Times: OldWine
in New Bottles? 127
Andrew Edkins
7.1 Introduction and Overview 127
7.2 The Collapse of Carillion: Consequences for Consideration – Implications
for Construction Supply Chains 129
7.3 Risk, Power Structures, and Supply Chains 132
7.3.1 Commercial Power and the Role of Law and Regulation 133
7.3.2 Technology-Based Power Structures: Cases of ConstructionWaste and
BIM 135
7.4 Conclusions 139
References 140
8 Linkages, Networks, and Interactions: Exploring the Context for Risk
Decision Making in Construction Supply Chains 143
Alex Arthur
8.1 Introduction 143
8.2 The Evolution of the UK Construction Industry and Supply Chain
Relationships 144
8.3 The Concept of Risk 147
8.3.1 Uncertainty 149
8.3.2 Probability 150
8.3.3 Risk as a Potential Future Event 150
8.3.4 The Impact of a Risk Event on an Objective or Interest 150
8.4 The Construction Risk Management System 150
8.4.1 Risk Identification Subsystem 152
8.4.2 Risk Analysis Subsystem 153
8.4.3 Risk Response Subsystem 153
8.5 Risk Generation in Construction Supply Chain Relationships 154
8.5.1 Project Risk Events Generated through the Project Delivery Processes 154
8.5.2 Project Risk Events Generated through the Network and Interactions within
Construction Supply Chain Relationships 155
8.6 Risk Management Decision-Making Systems in Construction Supply Chain
Relationships 156
8.7 Conclusion 159
References 161
9 Culture in Supply Chains 167
Richard Fellows and Anita Liu
9.1 Introduction – Context 167
9.2 Culture 170
9.3 Dimensions of Culture 173
9.3.1 National Culture 174
9.3.2 Organisational Culture 176
9.3.3 Fitting with Other Cultures 180
9.3.4 Organisational Climate 182
9.3.5 Project Atmosphere 182
9.3.6 Behaviour Modification 183
9.4 Values and Value 183
9.5 Ethics 185
9.6 Organisational Citizenship Behaviour (OCB) and Corporate Social
Responsibility (CSR) 187
9.7 Teams and Teamwork 188
9.8 Sensemaking 189
9.9 Motivated Reasoning 190
9.10 (Strategic) Alliances 192
9.11 Supply Chain Participants and Behaviour 194
9.12 Conclusion 199
References 201
Part II Chapters that Principally, but not Exclusively, Deal with Case
Study Material 211
10 ManagingMegaproject Supply Chains: Life After Heathrow
Terminal 5 213
Dr Juliano Denicol
10.1 Motivation for the Research 213
10.2 Construction Supply Chain Management 214
10.2.1 Temporary vs Permanent Supply Chains (ETO vs MTS) 217
10.3 Why Are Megaprojects So Important? 221
10.4 Megaproject Supply Chain Management 223
10.5 Conclusion 228
References 231
11 AnglianWater @one Alliance: A New Approach to Supply Chain
Management 237
GrantMills, Dale Evans, and Chris Candlish
11.1 Introduction 237
11.2 Supply Chain Management 238
11.3 Alliance Supply Chain Management 239
11.4 AnglianWater Alliance Case Study 240
11.4.1 Strategic Approach to Alliance Supply Chain Management 240
11.4.2 Alliance Supply ChainWork Clusters 241
11.4.3 Alliance Supply Chain Early Involvement and Collaboration 242
11.5 Evaluation of the Value of Alliance Supply Chain Management 244
11.5.1 Strategic Approach to Alliance Supply Chain Management 244
11.5.2 Alliance Supply Chain Management Provides an Effective Environment for
the Early Engagement of Specialist Suppliers 244
11.5.3 Alliance Supply Chain Management Can Create aWin-Win-Win Reciprocal
Relationship 245
11.5.4 Alliance Supply Chain Management Can Drive Team Innovation and Create
New Service Relationships 245
11.5.5 Long-Term Approaches to Alliance Supply Chain Management Can Drive
Strategic Business Benefits 246
11.5.6 Alliance Supply Chain Management that Uses Advanced Production Systems
Can Deliver Tactical Benefits 246
11.6 Conclusions 246
References 247
12 Understanding Supply Chain Management froma Main Contractor’s
Perspective 251
Emmanuel Manu and Andrew Knight
12.1 Introduction 251
12.2 Multilayered Subcontracting in the Construction Industry 252
12.3 Supply Chain Management: Principles and Practices 254
12.4 Supply Chain Management Practices from a Contractor’s Perspective 256
12.5 Case Study of a Large UK Main Contractor 257
12.5.1 Supply Chain Management Goals 258
12.5.2 Supply Chain Management Team 259
12.5.3 Supply Chain Management Classification 260
12.5.4 Supply Chain Management Practices 261
12.5.4.1 Audit Supply Chain Firms 261
12.5.4.2 Use Collaborative ICT Systems 263
12.5.4.3 Measure Performance of Supply Chain Firms 263
12.5.4.4 Engage in Continuous Performance Improvement Activities 264
12.5.4.5 Develop Long-Term Collaborative Relationships 264
12.5.4.6 Motivate and Incentivise the Supply Chain 265
12.6 Conclusion 265
References 267
11 AnglianWater @one Alliance: A New Approach to Supply Chain
Management 237
GrantMills, Dale Evans, and Chris Candlish
11.1 Introduction 237
11.2 Supply Chain Management 238
11.3 Alliance Supply Chain Management 239
11.4 AnglianWater Alliance Case Study 240
11.4.1 Strategic Approach to Alliance Supply Chain Management 240
11.4.2 Alliance Supply ChainWork Clusters 241
11.4.3 Alliance Supply Chain Early Involvement and Collaboration 242
11.5 Evaluation of the Value of Alliance Supply Chain Management 244
11.5.1 Strategic Approach to Alliance Supply Chain Management 244
11.5.2 Alliance Supply Chain Management Provides an Effective Environment for
the Early Engagement of Specialist Suppliers 244
11.5.3 Alliance Supply Chain Management Can Create aWin-Win-Win Reciprocal
Relationship 245
11.5.4 Alliance Supply Chain Management Can Drive Team Innovation and Create
New Service Relationships 245
11.5.5 Long-Term Approaches to Alliance Supply Chain Management Can Drive
Strategic Business Benefits 246
11.5.6 Alliance Supply Chain Management that Uses Advanced Production Systems
Can Deliver Tactical Benefits 246
11.6 Conclusions 246
References 247
12 Understanding Supply Chain Management froma Main Contractor’s
Perspective 251
Emmanuel Manu and Andrew Knight
12.1 Introduction 251
12.2 Multilayered Subcontracting in the Construction Industry 252
12.3 Supply Chain Management: Principles and Practices 254
12.4 Supply Chain Management Practices from a Contractor’s Perspective 256
12.5 Case Study of a Large UK Main Contractor 257
12.5.1 Supply Chain Management Goals 258
12.5.2 Supply Chain Management Team 259
12.5.3 Supply Chain Management Classification 260
12.5.4 Supply Chain Management Practices 261
12.5.4.1 Audit Supply Chain Firms 261
12.5.4.2 Use Collaborative ICT Systems 263
12.5.4.3 Measure Performance of Supply Chain Firms 263
12.5.4.4 Engage in Continuous Performance Improvement Activities 264
12.5.4.5 Develop Long-Term Collaborative Relationships 264
12.5.4.6 Motivate and Incentivise the Supply Chain 265
12.6 Conclusion 265
References 267
13 Lean Supply Chain Management in Construction: Implementation at
the ‘Lower Tiers’ of the Construction Supply Chain 271
Rafaella Dana Broft
13.1 Supply Chain Management in a Project-Based Environment 271
13.1.1 The Supply Chain Management Concept 271
13.1.2 The Project Focus in Construction 272
13.1.3 The Lower Tiers of the Construction Supply Chain 273
13.1.4 A Main Contractor’s Position and Role in the Construction Supply
Chain 274
13.2 The Characteristics of Construction 275
13.2.1 Construction from a Production Perspective 275
13.2.2 Construction: True Peculiarities?! 277
13.3 Lean Supply Chain Management in Construction 279
13.3.1 An Introduction to Lean 279
13.3.2 The Role of Lean in Combination with Supply Chain Management 280
13.3.3 Lean and Supply Chain Management in Construction 281
13.4 Conclusion 283
References 283
14 Knowledge Transfer in Supply Chains 289
Hedley Smyth andMeri Duryan
14.1 Introduction 289
14.1.1 The Supply Chain Issue 290
14.1.2 Learning and Knowledge Transfer 291
14.2 What Is Known – A Summary Review of the Literature 292
14.2.1 The Supply Chain Ecosystem 292
14.2.2 Supply Chain Learning and Knowledge Management 293
14.2.3 Prequalification and Bidding Processes 294
14.3 Methodology and Methods 295
14.4 Findings 296
14.5 Conclusions 301
References 302
15 Understanding Trust in Construction Supply Chain
Relationships 307
Jing Xu
15.1 Introduction 307
15.2 Towards an Understanding of Trust in Construction Supply Chains 308
15.2.1 Towards a Service-Dominant Logic View 308
15.2.2 Towards a Process-Based View 311
15.3 Methodology and Methods 314
15.4 Case Study 315
15.4.1 Context 316
15.4.1.1 Assessing the Shadow of the Past 316
15.4.1.2 Organisational Structure and Policy: Forming a Sense of Unfairness 316
15.4.2 Procurement and Preconstruction Stage 318
15.4.2.1 Early Involvement: Forming a Sense of Security and Familiarity 318
15.4.2.2 Two-stage Procurement: Creating a Sense of Equity 318
15.4.2.3 The Value of Trust 319
15.4.3 Execution Stage 320
15.4.3.1 Structuring the Project: Maintaining Security and Familiarity 320
15.4.3.2 Joint Activities: Forming the Interpretations of Trustworthiness 320
15.4.3.3 Using Trust Relations in Resource Coordination: Bounded Solidarity and
Economic Reciprocity 321
15.4.3.4 The Value of Trust 322
15.4.4 Completion Stage 323
15.4.4.1 Stabilising the Relationship: Trust as a Rule of Legitimation 323
15.4.4.2 The Shadow of the Future: Social Reciprocity 323
15.4.4.3 The Value of Trust 323
15.5 Discussion 324
15.5.1 The Constitution of Trust 324
15.5.2 The Value of Trust 326
15.5.3 Conditions of Trust: Influences of Ecosystems and Time 326
15.6 Conclusions and Recommendations 328
References 329
16 Summary and Conclusions 335
Stephen Pryke
16.1 Context –What’s the Problem? 335
16.2 A Summary of the Contributions 336
16.2.1 IT, Digital, and BIM 336
16.2.2 Self-Organising Networks in Supply Chains 336
16.2.3 Green Issues 337
16.2.4 Demand Chains and Supply Chains 337
16.2.5 Lean 337
16.2.6 Power Structures and Systemic Risk 337
16.2.7 Decision-Making Maturity 338
16.2.8 Culture 338
16.2.9 Lessons from Megaprojects 338
16.2.10 Collaboration and Integration 339
16.2.11 Lesson Learned and Findings from Tier 1 Contractors 339
16.2.12 Lean Practices inThe Netherlands 340
16.2.13 Knowledge Transfer 340
16.2.14 The Role of Trust in Managing Supply Chains 341
16.3 Key Themes and Agendas for Research and Practice 341
16.3.1 Complexity and Interdependence 341
16.3.2 Work Packages 341
16.3.3 Resistance to Change 342
16.3.4 Risk 342
16.3.5 Communications and Integration of Systems and the Green Agenda 343
16.3.6 The Role of the Contractor 343
16.3.7 The Role of the Client 343
16.3.8 Lean Construction 343
16.3.9 Collaborative Behaviour and Quality of Relationships 344
16.4 Final Remarks 344
References 344
Index 347

 

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