Medical and Healthcare Textiles Edited by S. C. hand, J. F. Kennedy, M. Miraftab and S. Rajendran

By

Medical and Healthcare Textiles
Edited by S. C. hand, J. F. Kennedy, M. Miraftab and S. Rajendran

Medical and heaithcare textiles

CONTENTS

Woodhead Publishing Series in Textiles
Preface

PART I INFECTION CONTROL AND BARRIER MATERIALS
Infedion control and barrier materirrls: an overview
S Rajendran, University of Bolton, UK
– Introduction
– Wound infection
– Hospital protective materials
– Bibliography
Antimicrobial properties of silvercontaining chitosan fibers
Y Qin and C Zhu, % Biochemical Materials Research and Development Cenlre, China
– Introduction
– Experimental
– Results and discussion
– Conclusions
– References
Copperimpregnated anthkmbial textiles: an innovative weapon to fight infeetion
G Borkow, A Felix and J Gabbay, Cupron Inc, USA 14
– Copper as a biocide –
– Clinical studies
– Discussion
– References
Incorporation of copper oxide into natural and synthetic fibres
Biocidal properties of fabrics containing copper oxide
A review of the role of microwaves in the destruction of pathogenic bacteria
A S Lamb and E Siores, University of Bolton, UK
– Microwave interactions with materials
– – Flowcytometry
– Concluding remarks
– References
Fixed ftequency microwave interactions with bacteria
Work carried out at the University of Bolton
Antimicrobial bioactive band-aids with prolonged and controlled action
P Shndric, L Simovic, M Kostic, A Medovic, KMilosevic and S Dimitrijevic,
University of Belgrade, Serbia
– Introduction
– ~ Experimental
– Experimental results and discussion
– Conclusion
– References
Comparison of antimicrobial textile treatments
E Smith, J T Williams, S E Walsh and P Painter, De Monij4orf University, UK
– Introduction – Materials and methods
– Results and discussion – Conclusions
– References 38
Evaluation of plasma-deposited anti-adhedive and anti-bacterial coatings on
medid textiles 48
A J Paul, F Bretagnol, G Buyle, C Colin, 0 Lepanc and H Rauscher, CSM Ltd, UK – Plasma treatment of textiles
– X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)
– References
Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToFSIMS)
Controlling the spread of infections in hospital wards by the use of
antimicrobials on medical textiles and surfaces
W C White, AEGIS Environmental Management, USA. R. BellJield, Carrington
Career and Workwear Ltd, U .J Ellis, Devan-PPT Chemicals Ltd UK and
Ir P Vandendaele, Devan Chemicals W, Belgium
– Introduction – Microorganisms
– Antimicrobials
– Organohctional silane antimicrobial technology –
– Potentialuses
– Hospital blankets
– Nonwoven surgical drapes
– Wound care silk dressings
– Uniforms
– Siliconerubber –
– summary
– References
Verification techniques and safety profile
– carpeting
Case study: the Arthur G. James Cancer Center Hospital and Research Institute
Inherenth antimicrobial alchite fibres developed for wound care applications
MMiraftab, C Iwu, C Okoro and G Smart, University of Bolton, UK
– Introduction
– Production methodology
– Results and discussions
– Conclusions
– References
Antimicrobial textilea for health and hygiene applications based on eeo-friendly
M Joshi, R Purwar and S W Ali, Indian Institute of Technology, India and
S Rajedan, University of Bolton, UK
natural products 84
– Introduction
– Conclusion
– References
Natural antimicrobial agents for textile substrates
Antimicrobial finishing of textiles based on neem extract
Investigation of the filtration properties of medical masks
MAkulin, I Usta, D Kocak and MS Ozen, Marmara Universiw, Turkey
– Introduction
– Materials and method
– Results – Conclusion
– References
Lint release charncteristia of nonwoven wipes
V K Kothari and R Loganathan, Indian Institute of Technology, India
– Introduction
– Design of measurement apparatus – Materials and methods
– Results and discussion
– Conclusions
Development of antimicrobial polyester uskg neem extract
S Wazed Ali, B Gupta and M Joshi, Indian Institute of Technology, India
– Introduction
– Methods
– Results and discussion
– Conclusion
– References
– Materials
Fixation of cationic antibacterial products before dyeing: a more
ecological process
R V Vieira, J G Santos, G A4 B Soares and J I N R Comes, University of
Minho, Portugal
– Introduction
– Experimental
– Results and discussion – Conclusions
– References
Preliminary studies into wash-fast antimicrobial treatments of polyester
0 Hawk NAllen, G C Lees, H Rowe and J Verran, Manchester
Me fropolitan University, UK
– Introduction
– Background
– Methodology
– Results
– Futurework
– References
Emyme-catalysed coupling of functional antioxidan@ onto protein fibres
S JUT and G MGuebitz, Technical University of Graz, Austria and V Kokol,
University of Maribor, Slovenia 126
– InttOdUCtiOn
– Materials and methods
– Results and discussion
– Conclusions – References

PART II HEALTHCARE AND HYGIENE PRODUCTS
Healthcare and hygiene products: an overview
S C Anand, University of Bolton, UK
– Introduction – Recentadvances
– References
Cellulosic materials for odor and pH control
J K Dutkiewicz, Buckeye Technologies Inc, USA – Introduction
– Experimentalmodel
– Ammonia emission studies
– FreshcomfortTMte chnology
– Conclusions
– References
Development of a high-absorbent sanitary napkin
A Das, V K Kothari and S Makhva, Indian Institute of Technology, India
– Introduction
– Results and discussions
– Conclusions
– References
– Experimental
Retention of anionic rurlactmt following garment handering and its potential
effect on dermatitis suffererr 156
H D Rowe, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK
– Introduction
– Experimental
– Results
– Discussion
– Conclusions
– References
Preparation of protective disposable hygiene fabric8 for medical appIications
MMontazer, Amirkabir University of Technology, Iran, F Rangchi, Tehran Azad
University, Iran and F Siavoshi, Tehran Universi& Iran – introduction – Experimental
– References
Development of surgical clothing from bamboo fibres
K Ramachandralu, PSG College of Technologv, India
– Introduction
– Materials and methods
– Results and discussions
– Conclusions – References 171
Thermal characterization and mechanical properties of PLA yam
A MManich, MMarti and R MSauri, Spanish Council for Scientijk Research,
Spain, D Cayuela, Technical University of Catalonia, Spain and M USS+
Universidade da Beira Interior, Portugal 181
– Introduction
– Materials
– Methods
– Results
– Discussion and conclusions
– References

PART III WOUND CARE MATERIALS
Wound care materials: an overview
M Mirajlab, University of Bolton, UK
– Introduction
– References
Wounds: natural healing mechanisms versus wound care materials
Review of papers on wound w e materials
Controlled drug release from nanofibrona polyester materials
M J Bide, University of Rhode Island, USA, M D Phaneuf and T M Phaneuf;
BioSurfaces, USA and P JBrown, Clemson University, USA
– Introduction
– Experimental
– Results
– Conclusions
– References
Development of odour (volatile molecule) adsorbent materials for healthcare
G Lee, S C Anand and S Rajendran, University of Bolton, UK and I Walker,
Lantor (VK) Ltd, UK
– Introduction
– Odour adsorbent materials
– Experimental work
– Results
– Conclusions
– References
Development of a decision support system for determination of suitable dressings for wounds 215
K G Karthick and M Miraftab, University of Bolton, UK and JAshton, Bolton
Primary Care Trust, UK – Introduction
– Research amongst nursing staff –
– Expert systems in medicine –
– Conclusion
– References
The need for a decision support system
Decision support system for wound dressing selection
Treatment of cotton fabria with ethyl cellulose dcrocapsulea
R Badulescu, University of Ploiesti, Romania and B Voncina, V Vivod and D Jausovec,
University of Maribor, Slovenia 226
– Introduction
– Experimental
– Results and discussion
– Conclusions
– References
Measuring interface pressure in compression garments for barns patients
E Maklewska, A Navrocki, K Kowalski and W Tmowski, Institute
of Knitting Technology and Techniques, Poland 236
– Introduction
– Investigation methods
– Testmaterial
– Test results and discussion
– Conclusions
– References
Psyllium: current and future applications
R Mmood and MMiraftab, University of Bolton, UK
– Introduction
– The psyllium plant
– Traditional food applications
– Physiochemical properties of psyllium – Recent medical application of psyllium
– Other applications of psyllium
– Conclusions
– References
– History

PART IV BANDAGING AND PRESSURE GARMENTS
Bandaging and pressure garments: an overview
S C A& University of Bolton, UK
– Introduction
– Causes of venous disorders

– Classification of compression bandages –
– Single-layer compression bandages
– References
Factors which determine sub-bandage pressure
Recent advances in compression therapy
Biomaterials with controlled elasticity for post-operation recovery 263
M Carmen and E Alexandra, The National Institute for Textile and Leather, Romania
– Introduction
– Testing methods –
– Conclusions
– References
Testing cytotoxicity and sensitizing potential
Results: sensitizing and irritation potential
A study of the pressure profde of compression bandager, and compression
garments for treatment of venous leg ulcers
MSikkq S Ghosh andA Mukhopadlyqy, National Institute of Technology, India – Introduction
– Materials
– Results and discussion
– Conclusions
– References
– Method 272
Development of threedm ensional structures for singlelayer compression therapy
S Rajendran and S C Anand, University of Bolton, UK 279
– Introduction
– – Compression systems
– Problems with current bandages
– 3D compression bandages
– Materials and methods
– Results and discussion
– summary
– References
The treatment of venous leg ulcers
Intermittent pneumatic compression and bandaging: the effects of external
pressure applied over bandaging 293
S Rithalia and A4 Leyden, University of Salford, UK – Introduction
– Methods and materials
– Results
– Conclusions
– References
Physiological effects of Lycra@p ressure garments on children with cerebd palsy
JAttard Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, UK and S Rithalia, University of
Salford, UK
– Introduction
– Cerebralpalsy
– ~ynami~c ycra@pre ssure garments –
– Method
– Results
– Discussion
– Conclusions
– References
Aims and objectives of study
Empirical modelling of elastic properties of pressure garments for healthcare
S Pereira, S C Anand and S Rajendran, University of Bolton, UK and C Wood,
BaltexLtd, UK
309
– Introduction – Experimental – Results and discussion
– Conclusions – References
Investigation of elastic properties of multhxid warp knitted bandages
MAkalin, D KoFak, S I Mistik and M Uzun, Marmara University, Turkey – Introduction
– Materials and methods – Results
– Conclusions
– References
PART V IMPLANTABLE MATERIALS
Implantable materials: an overview
S Rqjendran, University of Bolton, UK
– Introduction
– vasculargrafts
– Kneeimplants
– Meshgrafts
– SCafTOlds
– Bibliography
Designing vena cava 6ltera with textile structure9 334
J Yoon and M W King, North Carolina State University, USA and E Johnson,
Crux Biomedical Inc, USA
– Introduction –
– Discussion
– Conclusion
– References
Application of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a biomaterial in medical
textiles 342
S Houis and T Gries, R WTH Aachen University, Germany, E M Engelhardt and
F Wurm, Ecole Polytechnique Fkdkrale de Lausanne, Switzerland – Introduction
– Stateoftheart
– Production of medical textiles –
– Conclusion
– References
Projects using PVDF for medical applications
Textile scaffolds for tissue engineering – near future or just vision? 353
D Aibibu, S Houis, M S Harwoko and T Gries, RWTH Aachen Universiv, Germany
– Introduction
– Materials
– Results
– Discussion
– References
Visible invisibility: contamination-aware textile surface8
A Toomey, Royal College of Art, UK
– Introduction
– Infection risks
– Infection control –
– Conclusion
– References
‘Visible invisibility’ contamination aware surfaces 357
Textile medical produ- for the stabilization of the thoracic wall
E Alexandra and M Carmen, The National htitute for Textile and Leather, Romania
and N Alexandru, Victor Babes Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Romania
368
– Introduction
– Experimental
– Clinical experiments
– Results
– Conclusions
– References
Predicting the fatigue performance of endovascular prostheses
H Zhao, L Wang, Y Li andXLiu, Donghua University, China and M W King,
North Carolina State University, USA – Introduction
– Experimental
– Results and discussion
– Conclusions
– References
Integration and embedding of vital signa 8emom and other devices into tatiles
M JAbreu, H Carvalho, A Catarino and A Rocha, Universidade do Mnho, Portugal
381
– Introduction
– Review of the state of the art
– Overview of general principles
– Experimental, results and discussions
– Conclusions
– References
PART M MEDICAL DEVICES
Textilebased medical devices: an overview
J F Kennedy and C J Knill, Chembiotech Laboratories – Institute of Advanced
Science and Technology, UK
391
– References
What is a medical device?
Medical textiles and their applications
Biomaterials used in medical textiles
Design and release rates of a novel biodegradable slow-release implant for the
G J Dunn and A F Fotheringham, Heriot- Watt University, UK
prevention of paediatric dental caries 396
– Introduction
– Materials and methods
– Results and discussion
– Conclusions
– References
Maternity support garment for the relief of lower back pain 404
S Ho, W Yu, T Lao, D Chow, J Chung and Y Li, The Hong Kong Polytechnic
University, Hong Kong
– Introduction
– Studyaims – Study objectives – summary – References
Self-powered medical devicea for vibration suppression
L MSwallow, E Sores, D Dodcis and J K Luo, University of Bolton, UK
– Introduction
– Piezoelectric materials
– Power harvesting – Vibration suppression
– Device overview
– Results – Discussion
– Futurework
– References
Gas plasma treatment of polypropylene (PP) dental tape
J M Warren, R R Mather and D Robson, Heriot- Wan University UK and A Neville,
University of Lee&, UK
– Introduction
– Experimental –

– References
423
Surfme characteristics of plasma treated tape
PP tapes as dental flosses
Investigating hetare mechanisms of some non-absorbable sutures in Viva 430
A S Hockenberger and E Karaca, Ul&g Universily, Turkey
– Introduction – Experimental
– Results and discussion
– Conclusion
– References
Wearable microwave radiometry device for early detection of sub-tissue
T Shah and E Siores, University of Bolton, UK
oncological imperfections 437
– Introduction
– Detection of breast cancer
– Microwave radiometry
– Device integration with fabric
– Conclusions
– References
Main types of breast cancer
Microwave radiometer design and testing
Investigation of differences in Caprosyn, Biosyn, Polysorb, Novafil and
A D Erem and E Onder, Istanbul Technical University, Turkey and H H Erem,
GA TA Hayhrpasa Training Hospital, Turkey
surgipm sutures 449
– Introduction
– Method – Results – Conclusions
– References
– Materials
PART W SMART MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGIES
Smart materials and technologies: an overview
MMiraBab, University of Bolton, UK
— Introduction
– References
Smart testilea embedded with optical fibre sensors for health monitoring of patienta
F Pirotte, Centexbel, Belgium, A Depre, Elasta, Belgium, R Shishoo, Shishoo
Consulting, Sweden, J De Jonckheere, ITM France and A Grillet, Multitel, Belgium
– Introduction
– OFSETH research project
– Preliminary results
– Conclusions
– References
Integrating contactless sensors for stress level monitoring into clothing using
conductive threads
C Rotsch, D Zschena’erlein and U Mohring, TlTv Greiz, Germany
– Introduction
– References
Conductive thread materials for the integration of textile senson and actuators
Desiguing compressive stmtch garments for improved comfort and fit
PA Watkins, London College of Fashion, UK
– Introduction
– Garment pressure research literature
– Proximal fit pattern design
– References
Traditional pattern design and mobility
– summary
Blun hazard potential, pre-ignition and post-ignition thermal properties of textiles
A W Kolhatkar, J D Instifute of Engineering and Technology, India and
P C Patel, MS University of Baroda, India
– Introduction
– Materials and methods
– Results and discussion
– conclusions
– References
Assessing the performance of alternating pressure ah mattresses (APAMa)
S VS Rithalia and G H Heath, University of Salfrd, UK – Introduction
– Methods and materials
– Results
– Discussion
– References
Smart textiles with slow-release ceramides for sensitive skin
M Marti, R Ramirez and L Coderch, IIQAB (CSIC), Spain and M Lis, J A Navarro
and J Valldeperas, NTEXTER (UPC), Spain – Introduction
– Ceramides fiom wool
– Liposome formation and evaluation
– Application of IWL-ceramide liposomes
– Microencapsulation
– Conclusions
– References
PART Mn INDUSTRY STANDARJJS AND REGULATIONS
Directives,r egnlatio~an d standards for the medical device industry: an overview
C J Knill and J F Kennedy, Chembiotech Laboratories – Institute of Advanced
Science and Technology, UK 519
– Safety/quality standard monitoring
– Biocompatibility testing
– TheDrugTariff
– References
Medical devices in the EU
Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency
– CEmarking
Recent changm to the UK Drug Tariff for appliances listed in Part M
G J Collyer, Sumed International Ltd UK
– Introduction –
– The Gershon Review 2004 –
– Conclusions
– References

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