The Printing Ink Manual, Fifth Edition PDF Edited by R.H. Leach, R.J. Pierce

By

The Printing Ink Manual, Fifth Edition

Edited by R.H. Leach, R.J. Pierce

The Printing Ink Manual, Fifth Edition  Edited by R.H. Leach, R.J. Pierce

Contents

Preface xi

The editors and authors xiii

List of figures xiv

List of tables xx

Foreword xxii

1 The nature of printing ink 1

1.1 A brief history 1

1.2 The nature of printing inks 5

1.3 Visual characteristics of inks 5

1.4 The nature of printing inks as determined by the printing process 7

1.5 Methods of drying printing inks 9

1.6 The adhesive nature of printing inks 10

1.7 The resistance properties of printed inks 11

2 Printing processes 14

2.1 The offset lithographic process 15

2.2 The flexographic process 33

2.3 The gravure process 42

2.4 The letterpress process 53

2.5 The screen printing process 58

2.6 Ink-jet printing 62

2.7 Toner printing systems 66

2.8 Other printing processes 74

2.9 Print recognition 75

2.10 Substrate selection 81

2.11 The need for communication 84

3 Colour and colour matching 86

3.1 The physical nature of colour 86

3.2 The perception of colour 91

3.3 Additive and subtractive colour mixing 95

3.4 Origins of colour in printed material 101

3.5 Graphic reproduction 103

3.6 The measurement of colour 105

3.7 The recording of colour data and the specification

of colour 110

3.8 Colour matching 115

3.9 Instrumental colour match prediction 120

4 Raw materials 140

Section 1: Pigments 141

4.1 Yellow pigments 142

4.2 Orange pigments 149

4.3 Red pigments 153

4.4 Green pigments 170

4.5 Blue pigments 173

4.6 Violet pigments 180

4.7 Brown pigments 185

4.8 Black pigments 187

4.9 White pigments and extenders 189

4.10 Pearlescent materials 195

4.11 Metallic pigments 185

4.12 Fluorescent pigments 196

4.13 General properties of pigments 197

Section 2: Dyestuffs 199

4.14 Acid dyes 200

4.15 Basic dyes 201

4.16 Solvent dyes 204

4.17 Disperse dyes 207

Section 3: Oils 210

4.18 Drying vegetable oils 210

4.19 Other oils 215

Section 4: Resins 218

4.20 Natural resins 219

4.21 Synthetic resins 225

Section 5: Solvents 250

4.22 Hydrocarbon solvents 253

4.23 Alcohols 255

4.24 Glycols 257

4.25 Ketones 259

4.26 Esters 260

Section 6: Plasticizers 261

Section 7: Waxes 265

4.27 Synthetic waxes 266

4.28 Petroleum waxes 269

4.29 Natural waxes 271

Section 8: Driers 273

4.30 Liquid driers 274

4.31 Paste driers 275

Section 9: Miscellaneous additives 276

4.32 Chelating agents 276

4.33 Anti-oxidants 277

4.34 Surfactants 278

4.35 Deodorants and reodorants 280

4.36 Pure chemicals 280

4.37 Defoaming agents 282

4.38 Laking agents 283

Section 10: Raw materials for radiation curing systems 284

4.39 Pigment selection 284

4.40 Prepolymers 285

4.41 Reactive diluents 286

4.42 Photo-initiators 287

4.43 Additives and inhibitors 287

Section 11: Health and safety at work 288

5 Letterpress inks 323

5.1 Nature of the process 323

5.2 Types of press 323

5.3 General characteristics of letterpress inks 325

5.4 Physical properties 326

5.5 Raw materials 326

5.6 Letterpress ink formulation 330

5.7 Newspaper inks 333

5.8 Inks for packaging 334

5.9 Ink-related problems and their possible solution 336

5.10 Special purpose applications 339

6 Lithographic inks 342

6.1 General introduction to lithography 342

6.2 Cold-set lithographic inks 353

6.3 Web-offset heat-set inks 360

6.4 Sheet-fed inks for paper and board 387

6.5 Three piece tin-printing inks 431

7 Dry offset inks 453

Section 1: Dry offset inks for plastic 453

7.1 Drying mechanisms and the influence of the

substrate 455

7.2 Formulating principles 456

7.3 General characteristics of dry offset inks 459

7.4 The future 461

Section 2: Two-piece can decoration 461

7.5 Method of print application 462

7.6 Ink formulation 463

7.7 Ink properties required 465

7.8 Printing problems 466

7.9 Problem solving 467

7.10 Future trends 472

8 Gravure inks 473

8.1 General characteristics 475

8.2 Physical properties of inks and their measurement 483

8.3 Formulating principles 490

8.4 Inks and varnishes for specific end-use applications 502

8.5 Printing ink faults 536

8.6 Recent developments 540

9 Flexographic inks 547

9.1 General characteristics of the inks 549

9.2 Physical properties of flexographic inks and their

measurement 554

9.3 Formulating principles 560

9.4 Inks and varnishes for specific purposes 569

9.5 Ink-related printing problems and possible solutions 592

9.6 Recent trends 595

10 Screen inks 599

10.1 Important characteristics of screen inks 599

10.2 Requirements of raw materials 604

10.3 Inks for paper and board 607

10.4 Inks for impervious surfaces 610

10.5 Inks for plastic containers 615

10.6 Textile inks 618

10.7 Transfer inks 621

10.8 Overprint varnishes 622

10.9 Daylight fluorescent inks 622

10.10 Process inks 623

10.11 Metallics 624

10.12 Speciality screen inks 626

10.13 Inks for the electronics industry 628

10.14 Ink-related printing problems 632

10.15 Recent trends 634

11 Ultra-violet and electron-beam curing systems 636

11.1 Radiation-curing processes 637

11.2 Electromagnetic radiation and electron beams 638

11.3 Introduction to formulation 641

11.4 Advantages and limitations for ultra-violet and

electron-beam inks and varnishes 642

11.5 Chemistry of ultra-violet initiation and cure 642

11.6 Prepolymer resins for electron beam and

ultra-violet formulations 652

11.7 Diluents for electron beam and ultra-violet

formulations 657

11.8 Formulation principles for ultra-violet-curable inks 661

11.9 Ultra-violet-curable varnish and coatings 666

11.10 Cationic-curing systems 668

11.11 Present and future uses 669

11.12 Electron-beam-curable inks and varnishes 670

11.13 Radiation-curing equipment 671

12 Ink-jet inks 678

12.1 Introduction 678

12.2 Continuous ink-jet inks 679

12.3 Drop on demand ink-jet printing 694

13 Manufacture of inks and varnishes 699

13.1 General requirements 699

13.2 The manufacturing process 700

13.3 Mixing equipment 720

13.4 Milling equipment 726

13.5 Handling, storage and manufacture of UV inks 745

13.6 Manufacture of newspaper inks 746

13.7 Handling and storage of inks 749

13.8 Modern production trends 758

13.9 The future 765

14 Rheology of printing inks 766

14.1 Flow in ideal systems 767

14.2 Deviations from Newtonian behaviour 768

14.3 Apparatus for the measurement of the viscosity

of Newtonian liquids 775

14.4 Practical measurements for non-Newtonian systems 778

14.5 Tack 786

14.6 Tack measurement 787

14.7 Ink distribution and related matters 792

14.8 Rheological measurements and machine design 797

15 Testing, control and quality assurance 804

15.1 Standard tests 805

15.2 Sampling technique 805

15.3 Pigment testing 806

15.4 Inkmaking characteristics 808

15.5 Chips, predispersions and flushed pastes 814

15.6 Dye testing 814

15.7 Resins 815

15.8 Varnishes and oils 817

15.9 Solvents 820

15.10 Radiation-curing products 825

15.11 Miscellaneous materials 826

15.12 Ink quality control 827

15.13 Short-term ink testing 828

15.14 Long-term ink testing 833

15.15 Press performance tests 837

15.16 Dry print performance tests 843

15.17 Statistical process control 854

15.18 Quality assurance 861

16 Analysis of printing inks 865

16.1 Introduction 865

16.2 Chemical tests 866

16.3 Physical techniques 871

16.4 Instrumental techniques 873

16.5 Surface analysis techniques 897

16.6 Environmental monitoring 898

17 Health, safety and the environment 901

17.1 General indroduction to UK legislation 901

17.2 Health and Safety at Work, etc. Act 1974

(HSW Act) 903

17.3 Handling of dangerous substances in the

manufacture of printing inks 906

17.4 Mechanical and operational aspects 929

17.5 Specific printing ink applications 943

17.6 Some international constraints 949

This book is US$10. Order for this book:
(Request for free sample pages click on "Order Now" button)

Book Order
Or, Send email: textileebooks@gmail.com

Share this Book!

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.