Film Art: An Introduction, 13th Edition PDF David Bordwell, Kristin Thompson And Jeff Smith

By

Film Art: An Introduction, Thirteenth Edition

By David Bordwell, Kristin Thompson And Jeff Smith

Film Art An Introduction, 13th Edition

Contents:

PART ONE • Film Art and Filmmaking

CHAPTER 1 Film as Art: Creativity, Technology, and Business 2

Art vs. Entertainment? Art vs. Business? 3

Creative Decisions in Filmmaking 4

CREATIVE DECISIONS: A Modern, Old-Fashioned

Musical: La La Land 5

Mechanics of the Movies 9

Illusion Machines 9

Making Films with Photographic Film 10

Filmmaking with Digital Media 13

Making the Movie: Film Production 17

The Scriptwriting and Funding Phase 17

The Preparation Phase 18

The Shooting Phase 20

The Assembly Phase 23

A CLOSER LOOK: Some Terms and Roles in Film

Production 25

Artistic Implications of the Production Process 29

Modes of Production 29

Large-Scale Production 29

Exploitation, Independent Production, and DIY 30

Small-Scale Production 31

Artistic Implications of Different Modes of Production 33

Bringing the Film to the Audience: Distribution and

Exhibition 34

Distribution: The Center of Power 34

Exhibition: Theatrical and Nontheatrical 40

Ancillary Markets: Taking Movies beyond

the Theater 42

Artistic Implications of Distribution and Exhibition 43

Screens and Sounds: Stylistic Opportunities and

Challenges 45

SUMMARY 48

PART TWO • Film Form

CHAPTER 2 The Significance of Film Form 50

The Concept of Form in Film 51

Form as Pattern 51

Form Versus Content 52

Formal Expectations 53

Conventions and Experience 55

Form and Feeling 56

Form and Meaning 57

Evaluation: Good, Bad, or

Indifferent? 60

Principles of Film Form 62

Function 62

Similarity and Repetition 63

A CLOSER LOOK: Creative Decisions: Picking Out

Patterns 64

Difference and Variation 66

Development 67

Unity and Disunity 69

SUMMARY 70

CHAPTER 3 Narrative Form 71

Principles of Narrative Form 71

What Is Narrative? 72

Telling the Story 73

CREATIVE DECISIONS: How Would You Tell the

Story? 73

Plot and Story 74

Cause and Effect 76

Time 79

A CLOSER LOOK: Playing Games with Story Time 82

Space 84

Openings, Closings, and Patterns of Development 85

Narration: The Flow of Story Information 87

Range of Story Information:

Restricted or Unrestricted? 87

Depth of Story Information: Objective or Subjective? 90

The Narrator 93

A CLOSER LOOK: When the Lights Go Down, the

Narration Starts 94

CREATIVE DECISIONS: Choices about Narration in

Storytelling 96

The Classical Hollywood Cinema 97

Narrative Form in Citizen Kane 99

Overall Narrative Expectations in Citizen Kane 99

Plot and Story in Citizen Kane 100

Citizen Kane’s Causality 102

Time in Citizen Kane 102

Motivation in Citizen Kane 105

Citizen Kane’s Parallelism 106

Patterns of Plot Development in Citizen Kane 106

Narration in Citizen Kane 107

SUMMARY 109

PART THREE • Film Style

CHAPTER 4 The Shot: Mise-en-Scene 112

What Is Mise-en-Scene? 112

The Power of Mise-en-Scene 113

Components of Mise-en-Scene 115

Setting 115

Costume and Makeup 121

Lighting 125

Staging: Movement and Performance 132

A CLOSER LOOK: The Film Actor’s Toolkit 134

Putting It All Together: Mise-en-Scene in Space and

Time 141

CREATIVE DECISIONS: Mise-en-Scene in a Sequence

from L’Avventura 142

Space 143

CREATIVE DECISIONS: Guiding Our Attention in Blackand-

White and Color 149

Time 150

Narrative Functions of Mise-en-Scene in Our Hospitality 154

SUMMARY 158

CHAPTER 5 The Shot: Cinematography 159

The Photographic Image 159

The Range of Tonalities 159

Speed of Motion 164

A CLOSER LOOK: From Monsters to the Mundane:

Computer-Generated Imagery in The Lord of the

Rings 165

Perspective 168

Framing 178

Frame Dimensions and Shape 179

A CLOSER LOOK: Virtual Perspective: 3D 180

CREATIVE DECISIONS: Using Widescreen

Framing 184

Onscreen and Offscreen Space 186

Camera Position: Angle, Level, Height, and Distance of

Framing 188

CREATIVE DECISIONS: Camera Position in a Shot from

The Social Network 191

The Mobile Frame 195

CREATIVE DECISIONS: Mobile Framing and Film Form

in Grand Illusion and Wavelength 204

Duration of the Image: The Long Take 209

Real Time Is . . . What? 210

Functions of the Long Take 210

The Long Take and the Mobile Frame 212

SUMMARY 215

CHAPTER 6 The Relation of Shot to Shot: Editing 216

What Is Editing? 217

CREATIVE DECISIONS: Why Cut? Four Shots from

The Birds 218

Dimensions of Film Editing 219

Graphic Relations between Shot A and Shot B 219

Rhythmic Relations between Shot A and Shot B 224

Spatial Relations between Shot A and Shot B 225

Temporal Relations between Shot A and Shot B 227

Continuity Editing 230

Spatial Continuity: The 180° System 231

Continuity Editing in The Maltese Falcon 233

Continuity Editing: Some Fine Points 237

CREATIVE DECISIONS: Are You Looking at Me?

Point-of-View Cutting in Rear Window 241

Crosscutting 244

A CLOSER LOOK: Intensified Continuity: Unstoppable,

  1. A. Confidential, and Contemporary Editing 246

Temporal Continuity: Order, Frequency, and Duration 251

Alternatives to Continuity Editing 253

Graphic and Rhythmic Possibilities 253

Spatial and Temporal Discontinuity 254

CREATIVE DECISIONS: Discontinuity Editing in

October 259

SUMMARY 262

CHAPTER 7 Sound in the Cinema 263

Sound Decisions 263

The Powers of Sound 264

Sound Shapes Our Understanding of Images 265

Guiding Our Eye and Mind 265

Fundamentals of Film Sound 267

What Do We Hear? 267

Recording, Altering, and Combining Sounds 270

CREATIVE DECISIONS: Editing Dialogue: To Overlap

or Not to Overlap? 273

Musical Motifs in Shang-Chi and the Ten Rings 277

A CLOSER LOOK: Orchestrating Romance in Jules

and Jim 280

Dimensions of Film Sound 281

Rhythm 281

Fidelity 284

Space 285

A CLOSER LOOK: Offscreen Sound and Optical Point

of View: The Money Exchange in Jackie Brown 287

Sound Perspective 294

Time 295

Conversation Piece 299

SUMMARY 302

CHAPTER 8 Summary: Style and Film Form 303

The Concept of Style 303

CREATIVE DECISIONS: Style and the Filmmaker 304

Decision Making: Techniques Working Together 305

Watching and Listening: Style and the Viewer 306

Analyzing Style 307

  1. What Is the Film’s Overall Form? 307
  2. What Are the Main Techniques Being Used? 308
  3. What Patterns Are Formed by the Techniques? 308
  4. What Functions Do the Techniques

and Patterns Fulfill? 309

A CLOSER LOOK: Stylistic Synthesis in Shadow

of a Doubt 311

Style in Citizen Kane 313

Mystery and the Penetration of Space 313

Style and Narration: Restriction

and Objectivity 315

Style and Narration: Omniscience 317

Narrative Parallels: Settings 318

Parallels: Other Techniques 319

A Convincing Newsreel 320

Plot Time through Editing 321

Style and the Viewer’s Response 322

A CLOSER LOOK: Gravity: Film Style in the

Digital Age 323

SUMMARY 325

PART FOUR • Types of Films

CHAPTER 9 Film Genres 328

Understanding Genre 329

Defining a Genre 330

Analyzing a Genre 331

Genre History 333

A CLOSER LOOK: Creative Decisions in a Contemporary

Genre The Crime Thriller as Subgenre 334

The Social Functions of Genres 337

Four Genres 339

The Western 339

The Horror Film 341

The Musical 344

The Sports Film 348

SUMMARY 351

CHAPTER 10 Documentary, Experimental, and Animated Films 352

Documentary 352

What Is a Documentary? 352

The Boundaries between Documentary and Fiction 354

Genres of Documentary 355

Form in Documentary Films 356

Categorical Form: Introduction 357

CREATIVE DECISIONS: Engaging Viewers Using

Categorical Form 358

An Example of Categorical Form:

Gap-Toothed Women 359

Rhetorical Form: Introduction 364

An Example of Rhetorical Form: 13th 365

Experimental Film 371

A Range of Technical Choices 371

Types of Form in Experimental Films 372

Abstract Form: Introduction 373

CREATIVE DECISIONS: Designing Form in an Abstract

Film 373

An Example of Abstract Form: Ballet Mécanique 374

Associational Form: Introduction 379

An Example of Associational Form: Koyaanisqatsi 381

The Animated Film 388

Types of Traditional Animation 389

Types of Computer Animation 390

An Example of Traditional Animation: Duck Amuck 394

An Example of Experimental Animation:

Dimensions of Dialogue 396

SUMMARY 400

PART F I V E • Critical Analysis of Films

CHAPTER 11 Film Criticism: Sample Analyses 402

The Classical Narrative Cinema 403

His Girl Friday 403

Do the Right Thing 406

Moonrise Kingdom 410

The Piano 414

Narrative Alternatives to Classical Filmmaking 422

Breathless (À Bout de souffle) 422

Tokyo Story (Tokyo Monogatari) 427

Chungking Express (Chung Hing sam lam) 432

Documentary Form and Style 436

Man with a Movie Camera (Chelovek s kinoapparatom) 436

The Thin Blue Line 440

Form, Style, and Ideology 445

Meet Me in St. Louis 445

Ali: Fear Eats the Soul 450

CHAPTER 10 Documentary, Experimental, and Animated Films 352

Documentary 352

What Is a Documentary? 352

The Boundaries between Documentary and Fiction 354

Genres of Documentary 355

Form in Documentary Films 356

Categorical Form: Introduction 357

CREATIVE DECISIONS: Engaging Viewers Using

Categorical Form 358

An Example of Categorical Form:

Gap-Toothed Women 359

Rhetorical Form: Introduction 364

An Example of Rhetorical Form: 13th 365

Experimental Film 371

A Range of Technical Choices 371

Types of Form in Experimental Films 372

Abstract Form: Introduction 373

CREATIVE DECISIONS: Designing Form in an Abstract

Film 373

An Example of Abstract Form: Ballet Mécanique 374

Associational Form: Introduction 379

An Example of Associational Form: Koyaanisqatsi 381

The Animated Film 388

Types of Traditional Animation 389

Types of Computer Animation 390

An Example of Traditional Animation: Duck Amuck 394

An Example of Experimental Animation:

Dimensions of Dialogue 396

SUMMARY 400

PART S I X • Film Art and Film History

CHAPTER 12 Historical Changes in Film Art: Conventions and Choices, Tradition

and Trends 456

CREATIVE DECISIONS: Film Form and Style across

History 457

Traditions and Movements in Film History 459

Early Cinema (1893–1903) 460

Photography and Cinema 461

Edison versus Lumière 461

Early Form and Style 462

Méliès, Magic, and Fictional Narrative 463

The Development of the Classical Hollywood Cinema

(1908–1927) 464

Hollywood and the Studio System of Production 464

Classical Form and Style in Place 466

German Expressionism (1919–1926) 467

French Impressionism and Surrealism

(1918–1930) 470

Impressionism 471

Surrealism 472

Soviet Montage (1924–1930) 474

Artists and the State 474

NEP Cinema 475

The Priority of Editing 476

The Movement Ends 476

PART F I V E • Critical Analysis of Films

CHAPTER 11 Film Criticism: Sample Analyses 402

The Classical Narrative Cinema 403

His Girl Friday 403

Do the Right Thing 406

Moonrise Kingdom 410

The Piano 414

Narrative Alternatives to Classical Filmmaking 422

Breathless (À Bout de souffle) 422

Tokyo Story (Tokyo Monogatari) 427

Chungking Express (Chung Hing sam lam) 432

Documentary Form and Style 436

Man with a Movie Camera (Chelovek s kinoapparatom) 436

The Thin Blue Line 440

Form, Style, and Ideology 445

Meet Me in St. Louis 445

Ali: Fear Eats the Soul 450

CHAPTER 10 Documentary, Experimental, and Animated Films 352

Documentary 352

What Is a Documentary? 352

The Boundaries between Documentary and Fiction 354

Genres of Documentary 355

Form in Documentary Films 356

Categorical Form: Introduction 357

CREATIVE DECISIONS: Engaging Viewers Using

Categorical Form 358

An Example of Categorical Form:

Gap-Toothed Women 359

Rhetorical Form: Introduction 364

An Example of Rhetorical Form: 13th 365

Experimental Film 371

A Range of Technical Choices 371

Types of Form in Experimental Films 372

Abstract Form: Introduction 373

CREATIVE DECISIONS: Designing Form in an Abstract Film 373

An Example of Abstract Form: Ballet Mécanique 374

Associational Form: Introduction 379

An Example of Associational Form: Koyaanisqatsi 381

The Animated Film 388

Types of Traditional Animation 389

Types of Computer Animation 390

An Example of Traditional Animation: Duck Amuck 394

An Example of Experimental Animation:

Dimensions of Dialogue 396

SUMMARY 400

PART S I X • Film Art and Film History

CHAPTER 12 Historical Changes in Film Art: Conventions and Choices, Tradition

and Trends 456

CREATIVE DECISIONS: Film Form and Style across

History 457

Traditions and Movements in Film History 459

Early Cinema (1893–1903) 460

Photography and Cinema 461

Edison versus Lumière 461

Early Form and Style 462

Méliès, Magic, and Fictional Narrative 463

The Development of the Classical Hollywood Cinema

(1908–1927) 464

Hollywood and the Studio System of Production 464

Classical Form and Style in Place 466

German Expressionism (1919–1926) 467

French Impressionism and Surrealism

(1918–1930) 470

Impressionism 471

Surrealism 472

Soviet Montage (1924–1930) 474

Artists and the State 474

NEP Cinema 475

The Priority of Editing 476

The Movement Ends 476

The Classical Hollywood Cinema after the Coming of Sound

(1926–1950) 478

Converting to Sound 478

Problems and Solutions 478

Studios, Genres, and Spectacle 479

Deep Focus and Narrative Innovations 480

Italian Neorealism (1942–1951) 481

Leaving the Studio 482

A New Model of Storytelling 482

The Movement’s End and Its Legacy 483

The French New Wave (1959–1964) 483

Critics Become Moviemakers 484

A New Wave Style 484

Neorealism Recast 485

Into the Mainstream and Beyond 485

The New Hollywood and Independent Filmmaking,

1970s–1980s 486

Blockbusters and Indie Pictures 487

The Rise of the Movie Brats 487

Other Paths 488

The 1980s and After 489

Hollywood and Independents, To Be Continued 491

Hong Kong Cinema, 1980s–1990s 492

A Local Tradition Goes Global 492

The New Generation: Two Schools 493

Story and Style 493

Legacy Overseas 495

FILM ADAPTATIONS

WRITING A CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF A FILM

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES FOR “FILM AS ART: CREATIVITY, TECHNOLOGY, AND BUSINESS”

Glossary G-1

Index I-1

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