Solutions to Problems in Textile and Garment Industry | B Purushothama

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Solutions to Problems in Textile and Garment Industry
By B. Purushothama
Solutions to Problems in Textile and Garment Industry

Contents
Preface xiii
Foreword xv

1 In the wonderland of problems 1
1.1 Textile industry 1
1.2 What is a problem? 5
1.3 Hill as a problem 6
1.4 Hill as a beauty spot 7
1.5 Road with and without hurdles 13
1.5.1 Wicked Problems 15
1.6 This is your mistake 16

2 Roots of a problem 19
2.1 The tree in my yard 19
2.2 Theory of 1-30-300 22
2.3 Find the root 25
2.4 Preliminary questions 26
2.5 Personal balance sheet 30
2.6 Plusses, potentials, and concerns 30
2.7 Problem reversal 31
2.8 Cut the roots 33

3 So many seven steps 35
3.1 Problem solving techniques 35
3.1.1 Q.C. Story – Seven Steps for Problem Solving – Japanese system 36
3.1.2 Seven-step model from Mycoted 41
3.1.3 Creativity, innovation, and problem solving 42
3.1.4 A seven-step problem solving cycle – University of South Australia 43
3.1.5 Seven steps by Harry Joiner 45
3.1.6 Pushing through the problem – By small group communications 46
3.1.7 Gravel Gulch – Four steps to problem solving 49
3.1.8 Seven steps for problem solving by Tim Hicks 50
3.1.9 Kepner and Tregoe method – Seven steps each for problem analysis and decision making 51
3.1.10 PIPS – The Phases of Integrated Problem Solving 52
3.1.11 Problem solving stages by Kent Academy 54
3.1.12 Reductionism 55
3.1.13 Trial and error 56
3.2 Six problem-solving fundamentals 57
3.2.1 Use a structured problem-solving method 58
3.2.2 Involve people familiar with the problem 65
3.2.3 Apply project management techniques 65
3.2.4 Aggressively pursue the root cause 65
3.2.5 Communicate, communicate, and communicate 66
3.2.6 Conclusion 66
3.3 Beyond methods – Twenty points to help you solve problems 66 

4 Storm your brain 71
4.1 What is brainstorming? 71
4.2 Brainstorming history 73
4.3 Individual brainstorming 75
4.3.1 The upside of individual brainstorming 76
4.4 Group brainstorming 76
4.4.1 Benefi ts of group brainstorming 77
4.4.2 How to use tool 77
4.5 General outline for brainstorming 78
4.5.1 Set the problem 79
4.5.2 Create a background memo 79
4.5.3 Select participants 79
4.5.4 Create a list of lead questions 80
4.6 Brainstorming warm-ups 80
4.6.1 Word games 80
4.6.2 A practice run 80
4.6.3 A game of opposites 80
4.7 Osborn’s checklist for adding new ideas 81
4.7.1 Conducting session 83
4.7.2 The process 84
4.8 Brainstorming tips 85
4.9 Variations in brainstorming 86
4.9.1 Nominal group technique 86
4.9.2 Group passing technique 87
4.9.3 Team idea-mapping method 88
4.9.4 Electronic brainstorming 88
4.9.5 Random stimulation 89
4.9.6 Free writing 89
4.9.7 Other people’s views 89
4.9.8 Futuring 90
4.9.9 Breaking and bulleting 90
4.9.10 Cubing brainstorming 91
4.9.11 Similes 91
4.9.12 Clustering/ Mapping/ Webbing 92
4.9.13 Relationship between the parts 93
4.9.14 Journalistic questions 93
4.9.15 Think outside the box 94
4.9.16 Advantages, limitations, and unique qualities 94
4.9.17 Brain sketching 94
4.9.18 Brainwriting 95
4.9.19 Bullet proofi ng 97
4.9.20 Double Entry A-ha! Method (DEAM) 98
4.9.21 Buzz groups 99
4.9.22 Delphi methods 99
4.9.23 Fantasy chaining 100
4.9.24 Focus groups 100
4.9.25 Metaphorical thinking 100
4.9.26 Evoked sidebands 101
4.9.27 Rawlinson brainstorming 103
4.9.28 Role storming 104
4.9.29 Stimulus analysis 105
4.9.30 Successive element integration 106
4.9.31 Nine variations of brainstorming 106
4.9.32 Receptivity to ideas 108
4.9.33 Synectics 109
4.9.34 Directed brainstorming 110
4.9.35 Guided brainstorming 110
4.9.36 Question brainstorming 111
4.10 Brainstorming products and services 111
4.10.1 Brainstorming software 112
4.10.2 Brainstorm training services 112
4.10.3 Brainstorming equipment 113
4.11 Calling by different name 113
4.12 Conclusion 114 

5 Critical and creative thinking! 117
5.1 Components of critical thinking 119
5.1.1 Socratic questions 120
5.1.2 Creative thinking questions 122
5.2 Phases of critical thinking 123
5.3 Critical thinking skills 124
5.4 Critical thinking habits of the mind 125
5.5 Creative thinkers 126
5.6 Improving creative abilities 126
5.7 Hypnosis 127
5.8 Lateral thinking 128
5.9 NAF (Novelty, Attractiveness, and Feasibility) 128
5.10 Negative brainstorming 129
5.11 Observer and merged viewpoints 130
5.12 Other people’s defi nitions 131
5.13 Other people’s viewpoints 132
5.14 SCAMPER and SCAMMPERR 133
5.15 SWOT analysis 135
5.16 Simplex 136
5.17 Slice and dice 138
5.18 Panel consensus 139
5.19 Random stimuli 140
5.20 Receptivity to ideas 141
5.21 Search conference 143
5.22 Similarities and differences 144
5.23 Metaphorical thinking 144
5.24 Five fl exons 144
5.25 Innovation and problem solving 146
5.26 Role playing 147
5.27 No end to critical thinking but FIX IT 148

6 Use of Q.C. tools 151
6.1 Introduction 151
6.2 Data collection 151
6.3 Brain storming 153
6.4 Critical thinking 153
6.5 Flow charts – Process mapping 154
6.6 Critical activity chart 155
6.7 Boundary analysis 156
6.8 Check sheets 158
6.9 Concentration diagram 159
6.10 Stratification 159
6.11 Run-charts and control charts 162
6.12 Cause and effect diagram 163
6.13 Pareto analysis 164
6.14 Histogram 165
6.15 Scatter diagrams 165
6.16 Force fi eld analysis 168
6.17 Spectrograms 170
6.18 Listing pros and cons 171
6.19 RPR problem diagnosis 172

7 Diagnosis and remedial journey 175
7.1 Diagnosis 175
7.1.1 Steps involved in diagnosis 176
7.1.2 MECE thinking 178
7.2 Remedies 180
7.3 SODA – (Strategic Options Development and Analysis) 182
7.4 Potential problem analysis 184
7.5 Simple rating methods 185
7.6 Stakeholder analysis 186
7.7 Strategic assumption surfacing and testing 189
7.8 Strategic choice approach 193
7.9 Strategic management process 196
7.10 Assess by five golden questions 198

8 Manage the change 201
8.1 Dealing with the change 201
8.2 Resistance to change 202
8.2.1 Participation and involvement 203
8.2.2 Facilitation and support 204
8.2.3 Negotiation and agreement 204
8.2.4 Manipulation and cooperation 205
8.2.5 Explicit and implicit coercion 205
8.3 Chaturopaaya 205
8.4 Different models for bringing change 209
8.5 Ten principles for managing a change
by Dr. Joel. R. DeLuca 212
8.6 John P Kotter’s “eight steps to successful change” 213
8.7 SDI 215
8.8 Problem Centered Leadership (PCL) 216
8.9 Responsibility for managing a change 219
8.10 Change management principles 220
8.11 Human factors for problem solving 222
8.12 Problem solving strategies 224

9 Case studies 227
Case No. 1 – Drop in C.S.P of 12s combed bleached yarn 227
Case No. 2 – Steam damaging of grey yarn 228
Case No. 3 – Polyester contamination in 100% cotton spinning mill 230
Case No. 4 – Jewelry found in cotton balls 231
Case No. 5 – Quantum of contamination 232
Case No. 6 – Over production in sewing in garment industry 232
Case No. 7 – The Tamba Kaata Experience 233
Case No. 8 – Hipparkar 235
Case No. 9 – Taking order of 10CHC in mill running on 100 C Weft 237
Case No. 10 – Holes in the fabric seen after processing 238
Case No. 11 – Exhibition of barre effect 239
Case No. 12 – Cone sticker for 20s KHC (East European experience) 239
Case No. 13 – Visit of Mr. Barcroft 240
Case No. 14 – Collapse of a spinning mill supporting the family fi rms 241
Case No. 15 – Collapse of a spinning mill because of greediness of brothers working as directors 242
Case No. 16 – Cuts in weft pirns 243
Case No. 17 – 2/28K – SS and ZZ No complaint from a big customer but too many complaints from a small weaver. 243
Case No. 18 – Accident analysis 244
Case No. 19 – Government policy of hank yarn obligation 244
Case No. 20 – Modernizing led to loss 245
Case No. 21 – Over capacity of spinning 245
Case No. 22 – Shortage of skilled people 246
Case No. 23 – Assuming others as fools 247
Case No. 24 – Customer requirement and quality assurance 247
Case No. 25 – Bringing effi cient staff from a good mill 248
Case No. 26 – Absenteeism due to marriage at relative’s place 248
References 251
Index 261

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