Mechatronic Design in Textile Engineering Edited by Memis Acar

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Mechatronic Design in Textile Engineering
Edited by Memis Acar
Mechatronic Design in Textile Engineering

Contents
Preface VII
Mechatronics ................................................................................................................ .
JR. Hewit
The Mechatronics Design Process............................................................................... 27
J. Buur
Design Models and Methods· for Mechatronics.......................................................... 33
J. Buur
Advancements in Technology and its Impact on the Future Developments
of Mechatronics Concept....... ............................ .............. ...... ........ .............................. 47
G. Schweitzer
Intelligent Textile Machines and Systems.................................................................. 61
M. Acar
Recent Developments in Yarn and Fabric Forming Machines.................................. 67
GR. Wray
Some Aspects of Control of Textile Processes........................................................... 75
I. Porat, R.K. Aggarwal, W R. Kennon, M J. Alagha.
Constant Bulk False Twist Texturing.......................................... ................................ 97
P.W. Foster, S.K. Mukhopadhyay, R. Jeetah, I. Porat, K. Greenwood
Measurement Automation and Diagnosis in Spinning............................................... 107
B. Durand, L. Bouget, S. Bouget
Monitoring and Knowledge-Based Expert Systems in Spinning............................... 133
D.C. Adolphe, J.Y. Drean
Mechatronically Designed Magnetic Bearings for High-Speed
Spindles and Rotors..................................................................................................... 157
G. Schweitzer
Tension Compensation for Fixed Delivery Cone Winding :
A Mechatronic Approach............................................................................................ 179
T. King, S. Yang
Mechatronics in the Design of Textile Machines....................................................... 191
A. Arakawa, S. Imamura
Mechatronics Applications in Three-Dimensional Braiding...................................... 199
C.O. Huey
Design of an Automatic Weaving Machine for 3-D Net Shapes.............................. 215
M H. Mohamed, P. Gu
Development of a Lan System for Weaving Factories.............................................. 231
A. Arakawa, M. Ono
Computer-Aided Design and Manufacturing:
A Textile-Apparel Perspective.................................................................................... 239
S. Jayaraman
Mechatronics in Automated Garment Manufacture................................................... 271
PM. Taylor, M.B. Gunner
Sensing in Garment Assembly.................................................................................... 291
J.M. Gilbert, P.M. Taylor, G.J. Monkmo.n, M.B. Gunner
Keyword Index........................................................................................................... 309

PREFACE
In recent years, mechatronics products and manufacturing systems have begun to dominate the consumer goods and office equipment markets and the manufacturing industry. Application of mechatronics design concepts have also been apparent in textile machines. Most engineering products or processes have moving parts and require manipulation and control of their dynamic construction to a required accuracy. This may require the use of enabling technologies such as sensors, actuators, software, communications, optics, electronics, machine dynamics and control engineering. A key factor in the mechatronics philosophy is the integration of microelectronics and computer science/information technology into the design of mechanical systems, so as to obtain the best possible solution. Design of such products and processes, therefore, has to be the outcome of a multi-disciplinary activity rather than an interdisciplinary one. Mechatronics is therefore not a new branch of engineering, but a newly developed concept that underlines the necessity for intensive interaction between different branches of engineering. Hence mechatronics challenges the traditional engineering thinking because the optimum solution required for the best functional design must involve crossing the boundaries between the traditional engineering disciplines.

Increased flexibility, versatility, intelligence level of products and systems, safety and reliability as well as lower energy consumption and cost are the gains achieved through applying the mechatronics concepts to the design process. These advantages translate into a product or a system with more customer appeal, produced quickly at reduced cost and serving larger markets.

The days of electronic add-on in textile machines have now gone and the mechatronics design concepts find a suitable breeding ground and a major application field within the textile machinery industry. There will be a significant increase in the number of textile machines and systems which are designed using mechatronics philosophy. This, of course, will translate into increased efficiency, productivity and quality.

These proceedings contain a selection of lectures presented at the NATO Advanced Study Institute entitled "Advancements and Applications of Mechatronics Design in Textile Engineering" held in Side, Antalya, Turkey, 5-16 April 1992. Lectures were presented by leaders mainly from Europe and North America in disciplines contributing to the emerging international focus on mechatronics design and its applications in textile machines and systems. Participants in the ASI were specialists in mechatronics and/or in various disciplines in textile engineering and technology, a number of whom presented contributed papers during the Institute and all of whom participated actively in discussions on technical aspects of the subject.

The extent and variety of the lectures and contributed papers presented in these proceedings illustrate the contribution of numerous individuals in preparation and conduct of the AS!. The Institute Director wishes to thank the Organising Committee members for the advice and the guidance that he received, and all the contributors to these proceedings and participants in the AS!. Special thanks go to Mrs Brenda Cole who provided much useful administrative and secretarial assistance before, during and after the Institute. I am also grateful to the staff of the Pinto Travel Agency and the Saray Regency Hotel for looking after us so admirably and feeding us so well. Finally, without the financial support· of the NATO Scientific and Environmental Affairs Division, The ASI and these proceedings would not have been possible. Their support is gratefully acknowledged by all concerned with the Institute.

Memi§ Acar


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