Systems Engineering and Analysis, 5th Edition PDF by Blanchard Fabrycky

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Systems Engineering and Analysis, Fifth Edition

By Blanchard Fabrycky

Systems Engineering and Analysis Fifth Edition

Table of Contents

  1. Systems Science and Engineering

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 1

  1. Bringing Systems Into Being

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 23

  1. Conceptual System Design

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 55

  1. Preliminary System Design

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 101

  1. Detail Design and Development

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 133

  1. System Test, Evaluation, and Validation

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 157

  1. Alternatives and Models in Decision Making

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 179

  1. Models for Economic Evaluation

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 215

  1. Optimization in Design and Operations

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 251

  1. Queuing Theory and Analysis

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 303

  1. Control Concepts and Methods

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 361

  1. Design for Reliability

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 409

  1. Design for Maintainability

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 475

  1. Design for Usability (Human Factors)

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 535

  1. Design for Logistics and Supportability

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 565

  1. Design for Producibility, Disposability, and Sustainability

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 611

  1. Design for Affordability (Life-cycle Costing)

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 637

  1. Systems Engineering Planning and Organization

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 711

  1. Program Management, Control, and Evaluation

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 747

Appendix: Functional Analysis

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 773

Appendix: Design and Management Checklists

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 783

Appendix: Probability Theory and Analysis

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 789

Appendix: Probability and Statistical Tables

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 803

Appendix: Interest Factor Tables

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 811

Appendix: Finite Queuing Tables

Benjamin S. Blanchard/Wolter J. Fabrycky 821

Index 831

 

Systems Science and Engineering

Systems are as pervasive as the universe in which they exist.They are as grand as the universe

itself or as infinitesimal as the atom. Systems appeared first in natural forms, but with the

advent of human beings, a variety of human-made systems have come into existence. In

recent decades, we have begun to understand the underlying structure and characteristics of

natural and human-made systems in a scientific way.

In this chapter, some system definitions and systems science concepts are presented to

provide a basis for the study of systems engineering and analysis.They include definitions of

system characteristics, a classification of systems into various types, consideration of the current

state of systems science, and a discussion of the transition to the Systems Age. Finally,

the chapter presents technology and the nature and role of engineering in the Systems Age

and ends with a number of commonly accepted definitions of systems engineering.

Upon completion of this chapter, the reader will have obtained essential insight into

systems and systems thinking, with an orientation toward systems engineering and analysis.

The system definitions, classifications, and concepts presented in this chapter are intended

to impart a general understanding about the following:

  • System classifications, similarities, and dissimilarities;
  • The fundamental distinction between natural and human-made systems;
  • The elements of a system and the position of the system in the hierarchy of systems;
  • The domain of systems science, with consideration of cybernetics, general systems

theory, and systemology;

  • Technology as the progenitor for the creation of technical systems, recognizing its

impact on the natural world;

  • The transition from the machine or industrial age to the Systems Age, with recognition

of its impact upon people and society;

  • System complexity and scope and the demands these factors make on engineering in

the Systems Age; and

  • The range of contemporary definitions of systems engineering used within the profession.

The final section of this chapter provides a summary of the key concepts and ideas

pertaining to systems science and engineering. It is augmented with selected references and

website addresses recommended for further inquiry.

1 SYSTEM DEFINITIONS AND ELEMENTS

A system is an assemblage or combination of functionally related elements or parts forming

a unitary whole, such as a river system or a transportation system. Not every set of items,

facts,methods, or procedures is a system. A random group of items in a room would constitute

a set with definite relationships between the items, but it would not qualify as a system

because of the absence of functional relationships. This text deals primarily with systems

that include physical elements and have useful purposes, including systems associated with

all kinds of products, structures, and services, as well as those that consist of a coordinated

body of methods or a complex scheme or plan of procedure.1

1.1 The Elements of a System

Systems are composed of components, attributes, and relationships. These are described

as follows:

  1. Components are the parts of a system.
  2. Attributes are the properties (characteristics, configuration, qualities, powers, constraints,

and state) of the components and of the system as a whole.

  1. Relationships between pairs of linked components are the result of engineering the

attributes of both components so that the pair operates together effectively in contributing

to the system’s purpose(s).

The state is the situation (condition and location) at a point in time of the system, or of

a system component, with regard to its attributes and relationships.The situation of a system

may change over time in only certain ways, as in the on or off state of an electrical switching

system. A connected series of changes in the state over time comprise a behavior.The set of

all behaviors with their relative sequence and timing comprise the process.The process of a

component may control the process of another component.

A system is a set of interrelated components functioning together toward some

common objective(s) or purpose(s). The set of components meets the following

requirements:

  1. The properties and behavior of each component of the set have an effect on the properties

and behavior of the set as a whole.

  1. The properties and behavior of each component of the set depend on the properties

and behavior of at least one other component in the set.

  1. Each possible subset of components meets the two requirements listed above; the

components cannot be divided into independent subsets.

1This definition-like description was influenced by the Random House Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary, 2nd ed.

(New York: Random House, Inc., 2001).

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