Functional Textiles for Improved Performance, Protection and Health Edited by N. Pan and G. Sun

10:00 PM
Functional Textiles for Improved Performance, Protection and Health
Edited by N. Pan and G. Sun
Functional Textiles for Improved Performance, Protection and Health

Contents
Contributor contact details xiii
Woodhead Publishing Series in Textiles xvii
Preface xxiii

Part I Functional textiles and clothing for improved performance and protection 1
1 Improved textile functionality through surface modifi cations 3
R. MORENT and N. DE GEYTER, Ghent University, Belgium
1.1 Introduction 3
1.2 Types of surface modification 4
1.3 Physical and chemical characterization of surface modifications 8
1.4 Applications for functional textiles 19
1.5 Future trends 23
1.6 References 24
2 Antistatic and conductive textiles 27
X. ZHANG, North Carolina State University, USA
2.1 Introduction 27
2.2 Principles of antistatic and conductive textiles 28
2.3 The role of antistatic and conductive textiles 33
2.4 Types of antistatic and conductive textiles 33
2.5 Evaluation of antistatic and conductive textiles 39
2.6 Future trends 41
2.7 Sources of further information and advice 42
2.8 References 43
3 Ultraviolet protection of clothing 45
T. GAMBICHLER, Ruhr University Bochum, Germany
3.1 Introduction 45
3.2 In vitro and in vivo testing of the UV protection factor 48
3.3 Standards for sun-protective clothing 50
3.4 Type and construction of fabric 51
3.5 Fabric color, dyes and UV absorbers 53
3.6 Effects of environment and fabric use on UV protection factor 55
3.7 Conclusions and outlook 56
3.8 References 58
4 3D body imaging and fi t for functional textiles 64
B. XU, University of Texas at Austin, USA
4.1 Introduction 64
4.2 3D body imaging – stereovision 66
4.3 Surface modeling 72
4.4 Virtual dressing 80
4.5 Sewability and fi t assessment 91
4.6 Future trends 93
4.7 Acknowledgement 94
4.8 References 94
5 Flame retardant functional textiles 98
S. GAAN, V. SALIMOVA, P. RUPPER, A. RITTER and
H. SCHMID, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (EMPA), Switzerland
5.1 Introduction 98
5.2 Factors affecting fl ammability and thermal behavior of textile fi bers and fabrics 99
5.3 Types, chemistry and mode of action of fl ame retardant additives 103
5.4 Flame retardation of textile materials 105
5.5 Environmental issues related to flame retardants 121
5.6 Test standards for flame retardant textiles 122
5.7 References 123
6 Functional shape memory textiles 131
J. HU and Q. MENG, Hong Kong Polytechnic University,
Hong Kong
6.1 Introduction 131
6.2 Shape memory mechanisms of SMAs 132
6.3 Applications of SMAs in textiles 133
6.4 Shape memory mechanisms of SMPs 138
6.5 Applications of SMPs in textiles 140
6.6 Future trends 155
6.7 Sources of further information and advice 157
6.8 References 157
7 Thermo-regulating textiles with phase-change materials 163
S. MONDAL, The University of Queensland, Australia
7.1 Introduction 163
7.2 Concept of thermal comfort and clothing for cold environments 164
7.3 How PCMs work 166
7.4 Thermo-physiological comfort for PCM incorporated textiles 168
7.5 Different types of PCMs 168
7.6 Incorporation of PCM in textile structure 172
7.7 Applications of PCM incorporated textiles 175
7.8 Challenges of PCM in textiles 177
7.9 Acknowledgement 178
7.10 References 178
8 Infrared functional textiles 184
J. DYER, AgResearch Ltd, New Zealand
8.1 Introduction and overview 184
8.2 Principles of IR 185
8.3 FIR therapy 186
8.4 The role of FIR in relation to functional textiles 190
8.5 Applications 192
8.6 Benefi ts and limitations 193
8.7 Conclusions and future trends 194
8.8 Sources of further information 194
8.9 Acknowledgements 195
8.10 References 195
9 Functional smart textiles using stimuli-sensitive polymers 198
A. K. AGRAWAL and M. JASSAL, Indian Institute of
Technology, India
9.1 Introduction 198
9.2 Stimuli-sensitive polymers 198
9.3 Drawbacks and limitations of current SSP/hydrogels 204
9.4 Smart functional textiles 205
9.5 Conclusions 221
9.6 References 221
10 Development and design of performance swimwear 226
J. WU, Georgia State University, USA
10.1 Introduction 226
10.2 Development of performance swimwear 227
10.3 Biomechanics of swimming 231
10.4 Effect of innovative swimwear on swimming performance 236
10.5 Future trends in innovative performance swimwear 245
10.6 Sources of further information and advice 246
10.7 Acknowledgements 246
10.8 References 247
11 Key elements of protection for military textiles 249
J. R. OWENS, Air Force Research Laboratory, USA
11.1 Introduction 249
11.2 Camoufl age 250
11.3 Ballistics 253
11.4 Toxic chemicals 255
11.5 Conclusions 266
11.6 References 267
12 Developments in clothing protection technology 269
W. ZHONG, University of Manitoba, Canada and
N. PAN, University of California, Davis, USA
12.1 Introduction 269
12.2 Key issues of protective clothing 270
12.3 Developments in clothing protection 274
12.4 Future trends 284
12.5 References 285

Part II Functional textiles for improved medical and health purposes 291
13 New developments in functional medical textiles
and their mechanism of action 293
J. V. EDWARDS, ARS-USDA, USA and S. C. GOHEEN,
Pacifi c Northwest National Laboratory, USA
13.1 Introduction 293
13.2 Extracorporeals and implantables 294
13.3 Structure and composition: role of functionality in implantables 297
13.4 The role of biomolecules in conferring bioactive function 301
13.5 Non-implantables: wound dressings, pressure ulcers, hemorrhage control 303
13.6 References 314
14 Improving superhydrophobic coatings for textiles through chemical modifi cations 320
C. H. XUE, University of California, Davis, USA
14.1 Introduction 320
14.2 Key principles of superhydrophobic textiles 321
14.3 Chemical modifi cations for fabricating rough surfaces on textiles 323
14.4 Hydrophobization for lowering the surface energy of roughened textiles 327
14.5 Nanoscaled coating of materials with low surface energy 329
14.6 Applications 331
14.7 Future trends 334
14.8 References 335
15 Improving superhydrophobic textile materials 339
H. J. LEE, North Carolina State University, USA
15.1 Introduction 339
15.2 Physical modifi cation for superhydrophobic textiles 340
15.3 Applications 353
15.4 Future trends 356
15.5 References 357
16 Antibacterial textile materials for medical applications 360
G. SUN, University of California, Davis, USA
16.1 Introduction 360
16.2 Principles of antimicrobial textiles 361
16.3 The development of antibacterial textiles 363
16.4 Performance of antibacterial textiles 368
16.5 New antimicrobial technologies 369
16.6 Applications of antimicrobial textiles 371
16.7 Future trends 371
16.8 Acknowledgments 372
16.9 References 372
17 Antibacterial colorants for textiles 376
F. ALIHOSSEINI and G. SUN, University of California,
Davis, USA
17.1 Introduction 376
17.2 Synthetic antibacterial colorants 378
17.3 Natural antimicrobial colorants 381
17.4 Antimicrobial colorants from micro-organisms 393
17.5 Photo-activated antimicrobial colorants 395
17.6 References 396
18 Pyrethroid-laden textiles for protection from biting insects 404
D. G. HAYES, University of Tennessee, USA
18.1 Introduction 404
18.2 Key issues of insecticide-laden textiles 414
18.3 Factory-produced LLINs and textiles for protection from biting insects 414
18.4 In situ treatment of bednets and other textiles to enable protection from biting insects 424
18.5 Future trends 425
18.6 Sources of further information and advice 426
18.7 References 426
19 Improving the functionality of clothing through novel pesticide protection 434
S. K. OBENDORF, Cornell University, USA
19.1 Introduction to human exposure 434
19.2 Mechanisms for chemical protection 436
19.3 Development of novel pesticide-protective clothing 445
19.4 References 456
20 Biomechanics in skin/clothing interactions 462
M. XING and W. ZHONG, University of Manitoba, Canada
and N. PAN, University of California, Davis, USA
20.1 Introduction 462
20.2 An explicit fi nite element model of skin/sleeve interactions during arm rotation 465
20.3 Skin friction blistering: computer model 477
20.4 References 486
21 Transdermal permeation of textile dyes and chemicals 489
W. ZHONG and M. XING, University of Manitoba, Canada and N. PAN, University of California, Davis, USA
21.1 Introduction 489
21.2 Key issues of textile dyes/chemicals and skin irritations 490
21.3 An in vitro study of transdermal drug permeation 491
21.4 Stochastic modeling for transdermal drug delivery 496
21.5 Conclusion 502
21.6 References 504
Index 507

Read and Download "Functional Textiles for Improved Performance, Protection and Health" as PDF
How to Get Book? To get any book you can send Email: textileebooks@gmail.com

Share this

Related Posts

Previous
Next Post »